Safari plugin adds Beats Music to your browser, minus the Flash

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Apple has big ambitions for its new music streaming service.
Beats needs a native Mac app, bad. Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Beats Music is due for a big redesign come WWDC. Hopefully that means a native Mac app is on the way, as well as a web player that doesn’t use Flash.

While we’re waiting for Apple to trash its use of the web plugin Steve Jobs loathed, Chris Aljoudi has solved the problem with a brilliant Safari extension that brings Beats Music playback to your browser using HTML5.

Google boss says innovation is key to iOS search deal

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Could Apple really dump Google search? Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac
Could Apple really dump Google search? Photo: Killian Bell/Cult of Mac

Ever since Apple replaced Google Maps with its own solution there have been rumors that Google Search might be next on the chopping block. Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer has called the Safari search deal one of the premiere search deals in the world, and that her company would be more than happy to take over.

Google’s VP of products, Sundar Pichai, doesn’t sound worried about Google losing its spot anytime soon though. In an interview with Forbes, Pichai touched on his company’s complicated search relationship with Apple, saying the best way to avoid getting sidelined is to keep adding innovative features.

Steve Jobs was right: YouTube is finally HTML5-first

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YouTube is finally HTML5 first. Photo: VentureBeat
YouTube is finally HTML5 first. Photo: VentureBeat

Let’s flash back to April 2010.

That was the month that Steve Jobs penned his famous “Thoughts on Flash” memo, in which he soundly rejected any and all reasons for Apple to adopt Flash on the iOS operating system.

Jobs famously said that Flash was too battery-hungry, too unreliable, too insecure, too slow and too closed to be a wise platform for the mobile-first developers of then-tomorrow. And people scoffed at the time.

But who’s laughing now?

iPad haters’ initial complaints seem ridiculous 5 years on

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The dream to give ever student in the L.A. schools district an iPad has officially come to an end. Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac
The iPad is one of Apple's greatest inventions, but at launch, people couldn't stop complaining. Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Five years ago today, Steve Jobs introduced the iPad. A giant screen with one button, the iPad represented possibly the purest distillation of Jobs’ tech dreams. Yet at the time it was met with derision. “I got about 800 messages in the last 24 hours,” Jobs told his biographer, Walter Isaacson. “Most of them are complaining…. It knocks you back a bit.”

Half a decade and multiple iterations on, the iPad is an established part of Apple’s ecosystem. While it’s had its ups and downs, nobody’s flooding Apple’s inbox with iPad-related hate mail anymore.

So what were people complaining about? We hopped in our time machine to take a look at the original criticisms — and what, if anything, Apple’s done about them in the years since.