5 Apple Watch apps that are best left unmade

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Netflix Watch
Don't look for Netflix on your Apple Watch any time soon. You'd go blind.
Photo: Netflix (via YouTube)

The Apple Watch has been out for a few months now, and it’s given us plenty of time to decide what we do and don’t want from the wearable. It’s a versatile device, to be sure, but that doesn’t mean that we expect it to do everything for us. In fact, a lot of the apps that we use all the time on our iPhones and iPads would be ill-suited, if not impossible for that plucky little screen.

Here are some Apple Watch apps that wouldn’t break our hearts if nobody ever got around to making them.

Hacked Apple Watch runs Flappy Bird as native app

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Flappy Bird will have you tapping your wrist as if you're late for a meeting.
Flappy Bird will have you tapping your wrist as if you're late for a meeting.
Photo: Hamza Sood/Gizmodo

Remember Flappy Bird, the insanely-addictive iPhone game which spawned a million clones, despite being pulled from the App Store by its creator? Well, it’s back — as a native app for the Apple Watch.

Created by U.K. developer Hamza Sood, the Apple Watch app was created following the release of watchOS 2 at WWDC, giving the opportunity for developers to create native apps for Apple’s wearable device as opposed to the iPhone extensions that are currently doing the rounds.

Check out a video below.

How Crossy Road developers made $10 million in 90 days

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Who (and what) will make it across Crossy Road? Photo: Hipster Whale
Who (and what) will make it across Crossy Road? Photo: Hipster Whale

SAN FRANCISCO — Crossy Road developers Andy Sum and Matt Hall never set out to rake in a pile of cash. They did, however, want to create a popular game.

“We wanted to make the next Flappy Bird,” said Sum at the duo’s Game Developers Conference session here Tuesday.

“But our goal wasn’t to make money,” added Hall.

And yet make money they did. While Crossy Road hasn’t hit Flappy Bird levels of success (or notoriety), it pulled in 50 million downloads — on iOS, Android and Amazon — during the game’s first 90 days. It also generated $10 million for Hipster Whale, Sum and Hall’s development company.

Not bad for a game that was originally named Roadkill Simulator 2014.

Are you ready for the Flappy Bird arcade game?

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What’s worse than an infuriating free game that munches up your patience and your spare time in equal measures? An infuriating game that you have to pay for, of course.

Having swept mobile gaming in 2014 (and inspired everything from Apple II mods and Pebble versions to Street Fighter II mashups in the process) Flappy Bird is reportedly making its way to arcades — courtesy of Bay Tek Games, which plans to blow the tap-to-fly mobile game to fill a 42-inch display.