Apple is teaming with other tech giants for financial lobbying

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Apple raked in the cash last quarter.
There's money to be made in, err, money.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Apple, Amazon and Google aren’t exactly techie BFFs, as can be seen from that whole Android vs. iOS thing, or Amazon’s recent decision to boot Apple TV out of its online store.

But you know what can bring the heads of all three companies together? Let’s try a quick pop-quiz.

A) Team-building paintball trip.
B) Romantic candlelit dinner.
C) The promise of lots and lots of cash.

Click below to find out. (Hint: the answer is C.)

Cult of Mac Magazine: iPhone 6s is one sexy beast

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It's all in here.
It's all in here.
Cover Design: Stephen Smith/Cult of Mac

The iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus came out last week, and it’s been a fun ride getting to know what makes these sexy beasts tick.

Check out this week’s Cult of Mac Magazine for all the tips, tricks, reviews, news, and just plain great content with yet another digital issue of your favorite magazine.

Download the brand new Cult of Mac Magazine app from iTunes right now, and you’ll get all this, and more, absolutely free.

Apple Pay adds 23 regional banks and credit unions to growing roster

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Now even more of us not with major banks can use Apple Pay.
Now even more of us not with major banks can use Apple Pay.
Photo: Rob LeFebvre/Cult of Mac

If you’re a user of a local or regional credit union like I am, you’ll be excited to hear that Apple continues to add smaller financial institutions to its ever-growing list of places that will let you pay for things using your iPhone or Apple Watch.

With these 23 new additions, Apple now has 255 Apple Pay partners available to those of us who love the future of payments.

Apple will make 15 cents for every $100 spent on Apple Pay

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Photo: Apple
Photo: Apple

For every dollar spent on the iOS App Store, Apple makes thirty cents, but if you expect Cupertino to be collecting 30% of every buck spent on Apple Pay, you’re crazy. The world of finance is much more nuanced — and ruthlessly competitive — than selling apps: Apple will have to settle for just fifteen cents for every $100 spent. But that’s actually a lot of money in financial terms.