All items tagged with "earphones"

Double Whammy: These Phiaton Earphones Are Noise-Canceling And Wireless [Review]

Double Whammy: These Phiaton Earphones Are Noise-Canceling And Wireless [Review]

Phiaton’s PS 210s: with the included lanyard, also makes a great necklace

The Phiaton PS 210 BTNC ($129) earphones—yes, they named them all that—have all the same functionality as your white Apple earbuds; you can chat with ‘em, listen to tunes with ‘em, even control your iPhone with ‘em. But unlike your white-wired buds, they do all that wirelessly via Bluetooth, and include some sparkly noise-canceling technology that deliver audio to your ears sans a world of ambient sounds.

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Monster iSport USA Earphones: We’re Pretty Sure Only Olympian Michael Phelps Has Enough Gold And Cred To Wear These [Review]

Monster iSport USA Earphones: We’re Pretty Sure Only Olympian Michael Phelps Has Enough Gold And Cred To Wear These [Review]

You’re an American, and you’ve just watched your athletes come away with a barrel full of gold medals in London. Maybe you’re feeling a little patriotic; maybe a little like you want to go out and train for Rio de Janiero. If so, then Monster has created the perfect earphones for you: A special edition “USA” version of their impressive, washable, iSport IEMs.

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While Everyone Else Zigs, Fanny Wang Zags With Their Ambitious New Earphones

While Everyone Else Zigs, Fanny Wang Zags With Their Ambitious New Earphones

No doubt some of you will spring for these simply after hearing the name; but Fanny Wang is hoping their new bud-style Wang Buds earphones will conquer a territory they feel noone really owns yet: The earphone middle ground between the comfort, safety and simplicity of the iconic Apple buds, and the sound reproduction generally achieved by in-ear monitors — think really, really good Apple buds.

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Audiofly’s AF78 Earphones Hold Their Own in the Fight for Top Sonic Honors [Review]

Audiofly’s AF78 Earphones Hold Their Own in the Fight for Top Sonic Honors [Review]

We bumped into neophyte Australian headphones-maker Audiofly in January, during a press-only event at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, and gave two models in the four-model lineup a whirl. Their mid-level AF45 set sounded great for $50; but the next one I tried — the top-of-the-line AF78 ($200)left me slack-jawed with disbelief; its sound knocked my socks off, even amid the cacophony of noisy journalists.

What makes the AF78 unusual is its speaker arrangement.

Many mid-to-high-end canalphones are powered by tiny armature speakers, while moving coil drivers are found pretty much everywhere except the very high end. Armatures are generally better at producing clean highs and mids, but can lack deep bass; moving coils, on the other hand, are generally not as good at reproducing the clarity of an armature. But the AF78 is part of an elite group of models  — like the Scosche IEM856m I reviewed last year — that employ both a moving coil speaker and a balanced armature in each ear, in an attempt to give the listener the best of both worlds. And it works spectacularly.

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Plantronics BackBeat Go Bluetooth Earphones: Light As a Butterfly, and Just As Quiet [Review]

Plantronics BackBeat Go Bluetooth Earphones: Light As a Butterfly, and Just As Quiet [Review]

A long time ago, before this site was born, we reviewed the Altec Lansing BackBeat 906 Bluetooth headphones, and liked ‘em. Plantronics had their own identical version of the 906, as they had owned Plantronics since 2005 (the two companies parted ways about the time the 906 was released).

The Plantronics BackBeat Go ($100) is an evolution of the 906. Same principle — wireless (meaning there’s no wire conecting the player with the headset) music and calls in a compact form via the magic of Bluetooth — but in an even smaller and more svelte form factor. Should be even more fantstic, right? Let’s take a look.

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Klipsch Image One Headphones: The Best Little Big Headphones Around [Review]

Klipsch Image One Headphones: The Best Little Big Headphones Around [Review]

While other manufacturers might tart up their headphones with loud colors, obnoxious logos and frills, the Klipsch Image One ($150) drops all extraneous nonsense in favor of making you happy through its three impressive strengths: perfomance, comfort and portability — a triple threat that makes these headphones a contender for best traveling companion.

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Ultimate Ears TripleFi 10 Earphones: Pinch Me, I’m Dreaming! [Review]

Ultimate Ears TripleFi 10 Earphones: Pinch Me, I’m Dreaming! [Review]

So far it’s been pretty consistent: Each time we review a set of Ultimate Ears ‘phones, the bar leaps up a few notches as our expectations regarding the outfit’s offerings rise. After reviewing the 350, 700, and especially the 600vi — which garnered a best-in-class verdict — we were expecting the TripleFi 10 ($400) to slay vampires and cure cancer.

Of Ultimate Ears’ more serious offerings — and by serious, I’m referring to UE’s armature-equipped models, which start at $100 — the TripleFi 10 is by far the most serious, with three drivers and a crossover in each ear, pro-level detachable leads, the thickest cable we’ve ever seen on an IEM, Comply foam tips (the best tips, period) and a sound signature that’ll have you madly running through your entire music catalog with a big, gleeful smile plastered all over your face.

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Monster’s Turbine Earphones: I Find Your Lack of Clarity Disturbing [Review]

Monster’s Turbine Earphones: I Find Your Lack of Clarity Disturbing [Review]

What!? Neither Cult publication has ever reviewed Monster’s famed Turbine earphones, even though the IEMs have been hanging on Best Buy end caps for the last several years? Well, that’s an injustice we won’t let stand another day — after all, these are among the best recognized, and most iconic IEMs on the market.

The Turbine is the base model in Monster’s Turbine lineup; though with an MSRP of $180, “base model” seems like a relative term (the two higher models, the Pro Gold and the Pro Copper, are $300 and $400 respectively and are apparently better at reproducing a wider range than the plain-wrapper Turbines reviewed here).

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Monster’s N-ERGY Headphones: All Style, No Substance [Review]

Monster’s N-ERGY Headphones: All Style, No Substance [Review]

Monster collaborated with rapper/actor Nick Cannon to make the N-ERGY “high performance in-ear headphones.” I put the last part in quotes because the N-ERGY headphones ($70) are neither “high performance” nor “in-ear.”

I’m not an audiophile, but I appreciate and know good sound when I hear it. It took a total of 15 minutes for me to realize that the “NCredible” (yes, that phrase is used to market the product) N-ERGY headphones are awful. They look great, but they’re about as painful to listen to as Nick Cannon’s comedy.

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Music For The Masses: Budget Earphone Shootout [Review, Shootout]

Music For The Masses: Budget Earphone Shootout [Review, Shootout]

There are those faithful who will never surrender their little white Apple earbuds. To them we say: Wear proudly. But for the rest, for those who don’t want to deal with sub-par sound, earbuds flopping around and having to hunt for foam covers, come with us — and we’ll show you a world of possibilities.

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