Amaziograph: Draw Spirographic Kaleidoscopic Patterns Right On Your iPad

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Amaziograph really is amazio-ing. Do you remember the Spirograph, the plastic, cog-based drawing tool that lets you come up with all kinds of psychedelic geometric designs using paper and pens? Or the kaleidoscope, the favorite freakout kids toy of bong-smokers the world over?

Well, imagine that you could somehow combine the two into a smoke-free, drug-free (and more importantly, paper-free) app for the iPad. That app would be Amaziograph, a $1 drawing tool developed by 15-year-old Bulgarian high-schooler Hristo Staykov.

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Get Artist Corner For iPad And A Chance To Win A $100 Apple Giftcard [Freebie]

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Mischief Drawing App For Mac Feels Like Pixels, Works Like Vectors

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Oh man, does Mischief ever look amazing. It’s a Mac (or Windows) drawing app which feels like it uses pixels, but stores your strokes as vectors. This means that you can daub away with your favorite pressure-sensitive stylus, but enjoy the infinite zooming and tiny file sizes of vectors. Adobe Ideas does something similar on iOS, but this is a whole lot bigger.

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Draw This App Teaches You To Draw, Step-By-Step

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We all know how to draw the "Marvel way," right? Step 1: some lines; a skeleton for your figure. Step 2: ovals and circles, pencilled in to show the head, limbs and body. Step 3: The amazing, finished, inked-and-colored result. Congratulations: You’re now Jack Kirby.

Peterson Hamilton’s Draw This App aims to help out with step two-and-a-half.

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Ink Is The Digital Napkin You Need For All Those Coffee Shop Ideas [Review]

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Draw and share and nothing more
Draw and share and nothing more

The best ideas are famously (stereotypically, perhaps) captured on the back of a napkin. That’s the thing that’s been closest to hand at a zillion restaurant or coffee shop tables when great minds have got together and come up with something new.

Ink is a new, free digital napkin for the modern era. It’s also an exercise in minimalism, designed to replicate that napkin and the pencil you’d scribble on it with and nothing more.

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