Show A Single App And Hide All The Rest With One Click In The Dock [OS X Tips]

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Command-Option-Click

With all the RAM we have these days, it’s easy to get some serious screen clutter going on when you have a ton of apps open.

You can hide the current app with Command-H, and you can hide all the other apps except the current app with Command-Option-H.

But did you know you could go to any app that’s currently running, while simultaneously hiding all the other running apps?

Go Ahead, We Don’t Mind: Put The Dock In The Corner On your Mac [OS X Tips]

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Dock Upper Left

While no one puts baby in the corner, you can ignore that time-honored advice and actually put the Dock in the corner on the screen of your Mac.

While the traditional tools for moving the Dock around will let you move it to the right, left, or bottom of the screen, this little bit of Terminal magic will have the dock pinned to the far corners of your Mac’s screen, either the right bottom, the top left, or any other corner you can imagine.

Use The Dock On Any External Display With Mavericks [OS X Tips]

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Dock Shot

Mavericks has revamped Apples support for external displays, making everything a lot easier when using a second or third monitor.

In previous versions of OS X, the dock was only accessible on your main display, however, and it seems the same way in Mavericks.

Until you realize, though, that there is a new, simple way to get the Dock on an external monitor.

The Grove Dock Is The Beautiful Wooden iPhone Dock You Deserve

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As you guys probably know, I’m a sucker for wood on my iGadgets. My MacBook keyboard is covered in wood. My iPhone has wood paneling. Even my iPad is swatched from power button to Lightning port in a wooden smart cover and case.

Given the borderline hysteria I feel for love, it should come as no surprise that I want some wood in my iPhone dock… and Grove is about to make it happen for me.

Apple Will Sell Its Own Lightning Docks For The iPhone 5s

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iPhone5sdock

Apple hasn’t sold its own dock for the iPhone since introducing the Lightning connector on the iPhone 5, but it looks like the company has had a change of heart, and will start selling an iPhone 5s dock for $29 starting on September 20th at Apple retail stores.

Along with being able to charge your iPhone 5 or iPhone 5s, the new dock also has some “special audio porting” to make speakerphone calls clear while placed in the dock. An iPhone 5c dock will also be available for the same price.

 

 

Landing Zone Dock Turns A MacBook Air Into A Mini Mac Pro [Review]

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Landing Zone byLanding Zone
Category: MacBook Docks
Works With:MacBook Air 13-inch
Price: $200

My 13-inch MacBook Air is a fantastic portable computer – fast, light, crazy battery life and with a “bigger” screen than my old 13-inch aluminum MacBook[1]. But as a desktop computer it sucks: only two USB ports, no Ethernet, and a tiny amount of storage.

Which is exactly why the Landing Zone exists. It’s a dock that stays on your desk, hooked up to all your peripherals, and which grabs onto your MacBook like a facehugger grabs onto, uh, a face.

I’ve been using one for a while now, and it’s almost entirely excellent.

Hate Gorilla Arm? The Saidoka Is The Most Useable iPhone Dock Yet [Review]

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An iPhone dock is a pleasant thing to have on one’s desk. It keeps things nice and tidy, while making it easy to holster your iPhone and juice it up without mucking around with wires.

Saidoka by BlueLounge
Category: iPhone Dock
Works With: iPhone 4, 4S, 5
Price: $29.99-$49.99

There is one way in which tethering your iPhone via cable directly to your computer is superior, though. It’s easier to actually use your iPhone that way instead of gorilla-arming it.

That’s the brilliance of the Saidoka: it’s an iPhone dock that lets you easily tap our text messages, answer calls, and even play games, all while your iPhone is charging and syncing.

Do It Your Way – Set A Custom Delay Period To Unhide The Dock [OS X Tips]

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Dock Unhide Delay

I routinely hide the Dock on my Macbook Air, since it takes up a significant portion of my screen. While I use Alfred most of the time to launch apps and such, I still like to use the Dock; call it a hold over from the last ten years or so.

Sometimes, though, when I move the mouse cursor over to the side of the screen I keep the Dock on (the left, if you’re curious), it pops up even when I don’t want it to.

Then I found this Terminal command which lets me set the time delay between when my cursor hits the edge of my screen and when the Dock actually appears. Now I have the delay period set to a larger number, making it much slower to respond and unhide.