Here’s how much the iPhone costs around the world

Don't lose your iPhone in Brazil apparently.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

How does the iPhone cost where you live stack up against the rest of the world? Deutsche Bank’s annual “Mapping the World’s Prices” report for 2016 has arrived, and it compares the prices of 20 popular items in global cities around the world — including Apple’s iPhone 6.

The big message? Mainly that you shouldn’t misplace your iPhone while in Brazil, India, Sweden, Denmark, Indonesia, or Italy. Check it out below.

Timbuk2 Factory Tour Highlights Offshoring Issues at Apple [Gallery]



SAN FRANCISCO — American companies are rightly proud to show off any manufacturing facilities supporting jobs during the current recession, and San Francisco-based Timbuk2 is no exception. This week, the company known for its messenger bags showed us the hangar here in the Mission district where workers cut and sew colorful swaths of material and help contribute to the local manufacturing economy.

As a group of reporters was ushered through the trendy open-plan set-up, it made us think about what a factory tour of Apple’s manufacturing plants would be like. We’ll never know, of course. Tim Cook would never allow a tour like this one.

Apple Practically Gives OS X Away And It Still Costs Less Than XP To Support


Apple's update strategy saves a lot of money over maintaining Windows XP
Apple's update strategy can save companies lot of money over maintaining Windows XP

There are a handful of intrinsic beliefs that Apple has as company – most of which came from Steve Jobs. The constant focus on building experiences rather than just products is one of them. Another is that Apple looks forward and not backward when it comes to technology. The company simply acknowledges that to offer its users truly great new experiences (and products), it cannot hold onto (and be held back by) outdated technology.

Apple often gets criticized for pushing its technologies and its users forward, particularly in business and enterprise IT circles. Despite that criticism, Apple may be doing companies (and users) a big favor by not supporting older Macs and OS X releases indefinitely as Microsoft does with Windows XP – and that advantage isn’t just about better products.

An IDC study commissioned by Microsoft discovered that supporting XP now costs companies and schools five times what it would cost them to support Windows 7 – making Apple’s forward-looking policy not only technically advantageous but also significantly less expense in the long run.