Phew! Instagram update restores log out button

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You're not trapped in the same account forever after all.
Photo: Photo: Stephen Smith/Cult of Mac

Head into the App Store and get the latest Instagram update because it solves a huge problem: You can finally log out of your account. Ordinarily, this wouldn’t be a breakthrough new feature, but it is now if you’ve been severely confused about how to escape lately.

Apple confirms it’s working on a fix for ‘1970’ iPhone bug

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The iPhone 6s is Apple's best smartphone yet. But is it worth the upgrade?
Apple's working to fix the problem.
Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Apple has acknowledged the existence of a somewhat bizarre bug which bricks any iOS devices that has its date set back to 1970 — and confirms that a fix is on the way.

“An upcoming software update will prevent this issue from affecting iOS devices,” Apple notes on one of its support pages.

While there’s no word on exactly when this software update will be made available, it’s good to know that Apple is on the case.

This iPhone date bug will permanently brick your device

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Apple is investigating battery issues for the iPhone 6s.
Do not wind back the clock to the 70's on your iPhone.
Photo: Buster Hein/Cult of Mac

There are many ways iPhone users can unintentionally brick their devices, but YouTuber Zach Straley may have just discovered the quickest way to turn your beautiful iPhone into a worthless slab of metal, glass, and silicone.

Simply set your iPhone’s date to January 1, 1970 and your device will become nothing better than a paperweight. The bug was supposedly found by a Chinese iPhone users who was trying to solve a date issue with iOS 9.3 beta 3. Not even a DFU restore will bring the device back to life once you set the time back to 1970 and reboot.

Straley posted a video of the bug in action. Needless to say, don’t try this at home:

In-app purchases flaw exposes developers to costly hacks

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With 2 million apps, the App Store is almost too big.
With 2 million apps, the App Store is almost too big.
Photo: PhotoAtelier/Flickr

Sloppy coding in some popular iOS games allows hackers to give themselves and others thousands of dollars’ worth of in-app purchases for free.

The hole was discovered by developers at DigiDNA, creator of a backup tool called iMazing that allows iPhone and iPad users to access their devices’ hidden file systems. The developers found that the app backup/restore feature in iMazing 1.3 exposes weaknesses in the way games like Angry Birds 2 and Tetris Free handle in-app purchases.

To demonstrate how easy it is to hack in-app purchases using this method, the DigiDNA team tweaked Angry Birds 2 to start the game with 999,999,999 gems — the equivalent of $10,000 of in-game credits.