Working Apple-1 goes (kind of) cheap at auction

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Going, going, gone! Photo: Christie's

A working Apple-1 computer has sold at a Christie’s auction for $365,000: more than 600x the $600 that was paid for it back in July 1976, when it was bought from Steve Jobs.

While the figure is certainly sizeable, however, it’s also a bit of a disappointment when you consider that just two months ago, a similar machine fetched an eye-watering $905,000, when it was acquired by the Henry Ford museum in Dearborn, Michigan, to be part of its ongoing collection. “It’s very rare to be able to collect the beginning of something, but the Apple-1 is exactly that,” Henry Ford curator Kristen Gallerneaux told Cult of Mac shortly after that auction had concluded.

Yesterday’s Christie’s auction in New York had expected the Apple-1 to sell for between $400,000 and $600,000, although there had been some speculation it could break the $1 million mark.

The Apple-1 came complete with a mounted cancelled check for his purchase, made out to Apple Computer by original owner Charles Ricketts.

Another Apple-1 expected to make big bucks at auction

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A previous Apple-1 which went up for auction.
Photo: Auction Team Breker
Photo: Auction Team Breker

Just weeks after a rare Apple-1 computer sold for record numbers at auction, another operational unit of Apple’s first ever computer is set to go under the gavel.

Christie’s is expecting the machine to fetch more than $500,000 at auction in December, which doesn’t seem unrealistic when you consider that the previous Apple-1 mentioned fetched a whopping $905,000.

Let the bidding begin on working Apple I

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A working motherboard for the Apple I, circa
A working motherboard for the Apple I, circa 1976. Photo: Bonhams

Nestled among the vintage globes, surgical drawings and reflecting telescopes at Bonhams New York’s upcoming “History of Science” auction are spectacular several Apple-related goodies.

Most impressive of all of these is an Apple 1 motherboard, circa 1976. Described as being in “superb overall condition,” this is the first computer ever built by Steve Wozniak under the Apple banner, prior to the far more successful and mainstream Apple II.

Only 200 units of the Apple I were ever made, although just 63 are thought to still survive — and only 15 of these are documented as having worked since 2000.

This is one of them.

Rare Superman comic fetches record $3.2 million

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Courtesy DC Comics Wiki
Courtesy DC Comics Wiki

Earlier this week, a copy of the holy grail of comic book collecting, Action Comics No. 1 from 1938, sold on eBay for a record shattering sum of $3.2 million.

This pristine copy of Superman’s first appearance in comic books sold for a whopping $1,046,852 more than the previous record-holder, a less pristine copy of Action Comics‘ first issue, which sold for $2.1 million back in 2011. There are only an estimated 50 copies of the hotly collectible title left in the world.

Rare portrait-mode Mac prototype up for auction

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From a rare Apple Lisa computer to the original rainbow-colored signs from the Cupertino offices there have been some great Apple items up for auction as of late. Now you can add “rare Mac prototype” to that list.

A prototype model made out of painted foam, this alternate Macintosh LC model was built in 1989 by Apple’s Industrial Design Group and Matrix Product Design (which later became IDEO). Unlike the actual Mac LC that shipped it has a vertically-oriented screen: possibly targeted toward the business world, rather than the artistic, publishing and educational markets that the Mac traditionally sold to at the time.