Andy Warhol’s classic Macintosh ad can be yours for $600,000

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Apple (from Ads).
Apple (from Ads).
Photo: Andy Warhol

Old Apple computers are no stranger to Sotheby’s, but next week a different piece of Apple history is hitting the auction block, only this high-priced collectors item was created by Andy Warhol instead of Steve Jobs.

Warhol’s acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas painting of the classic Apple logo is going up for auction and could fetch as much as $600,000 according to early estimates. The painting is part of Warhol’s ‘Ads’ suite of creations which were created in 1985, just one year after the Macintosh launched.

The painting wasn’t created using a Macintosh, but Sotheby’s includes this interesting anecdote of how Warhol first met Steve Jobs when the Apple CEO came over to John Lennon’s house to setup a Macintosh for his son:

Very first Apple computer hits auction block at mind-blowing price

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Bids for this Apple I start at $370,000.
Bids for this Apple I start at $370,000.
Photo: Christie's

Some of the most important scientific instruments of the past 700 years are hitting the auction block later this month, but one of the newest creations in the lot — one of the very first computers created by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak — is expect to fetch the highest bid.

Working Apple-1 goes (kind of) cheap at auction

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apple-1-dec-2014-auction
Going, going, gone! Photo: Christie's

A working Apple-1 computer has sold at a Christie’s auction for $365,000: more than 600x the $600 that was paid for it back in July 1976, when it was bought from Steve Jobs.

While the figure is certainly sizeable, however, it’s also a bit of a disappointment when you consider that just two months ago, a similar machine fetched an eye-watering $905,000, when it was acquired by the Henry Ford museum in Dearborn, Michigan, to be part of its ongoing collection. “It’s very rare to be able to collect the beginning of something, but the Apple-1 is exactly that,” Henry Ford curator Kristen Gallerneaux told Cult of Mac shortly after that auction had concluded.

Yesterday’s Christie’s auction in New York had expected the Apple-1 to sell for between $400,000 and $600,000, although there had been some speculation it could break the $1 million mark.

The Apple-1 came complete with a mounted cancelled check for his purchase, made out to Apple Computer by original owner Charles Ricketts.

Another Apple-1 expected to make big bucks at auction

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A previous Apple-1 which went up for auction.
Photo: Auction Team Breker
Photo: Auction Team Breker

Just weeks after a rare Apple-1 computer sold for record numbers at auction, another operational unit of Apple’s first ever computer is set to go under the gavel.

Christie’s is expecting the machine to fetch more than $500,000 at auction in December, which doesn’t seem unrealistic when you consider that the previous Apple-1 mentioned fetched a whopping $905,000.