Merriam-Webster calls Apple fans ‘sheeple’

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Sydney
Some Australian sheeple photographed in the wild.
Photo: Apple

It is officially proper English to call compliant people — including Apple fans — “sheeple.”

The wordsmiths at Merriam-Webster revealed “sheeple” as the newest entry in the dictionary this morning. And according to the definition, Apple fans are a prime example of sheeple in the real world.

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This toy Mac built for dolls now runs Photoshop

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This tiny toy Mac runs Photoshop for work on tiny pictures.
This tiny Mac can run tiny Photoshop for work on tiny pictures.
Photo: Javier Rivera

Javier Rivera has a daughter, but the American Girl doll accessory he found on eBay was for him. It was a miniature Macintosh computer, a non-working toy for an 18-inch doll, and he had to have it.

The nerd in him believed he could make it run Photoshop.

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Meet Steve Jobs’ alter ego on the opera stage

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Ashton Kutcher and Michael Fassbender played Steve Jobs in movies. Now Edward Parks III brings his rich baritone voice to the Steve Jobs opera, The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs.
Ashton Kutcher and Michael Fassbender played Steve Jobs in movies. Now opera's Edward Parks III brings his rich baritone voice to The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs.
Photo: Dario Acosta/Santa Fe Opera

Edward Parks III will likely be the first character on an opera stage to perform in running shoes, jeans and a black mock turtleneck shirt.

Yet Parks knows there is nothing casual about playing Steve Jobs. He is soaking up all he can about the late Apple co-founder as he prepares to bring his much-heralded baritone voice to the role this summer in the world premiere of The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs at the Santa Fe Opera.

“I’m taking in everything that is out there and stuffing it in my head so that I can come away with my own thoughts of who he was and what he means to us,” Parks, 33, told Cult of Mac. “I think at first it was a little daunting. This is going to have a lot of attention, not just from the opera world but in the tech community.”

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Watch a rare Apple I power up like it’s 1976

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This is one of six Apple I computers in the world that actually work.
This is one of six Apple I computers in the world that actually work.
Photo: Victoria & Albert Museum/YouTube

Take a good look at that slim iPhone 7 in your hand, or the powerful MacBook Pro balanced on your knees. Then imagine the very first circuit board that flipped the switch to power a revolution that put those devices in your possession.

A video recently posted to YouTube by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London shows a working Apple I computer, one of only six known in the world today.

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These cases will protect your (RED) iPhone without covering the color

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Casetify offers elegant and quirky designs for a clear iPhone case to bring out the red on the new PRODUCT(RED) iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.
Casetify offers elegant and quirky designs for a clear iPhone case to bring out the red on the new PRODUCT(RED) iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.
Photo: Casetify

Surely, you’re not going to order the special edition iPhone 7 and then slap on a case that covers up that beautiful red aluminum.

Accessories company Casetify is offering a clear case for the (PRODUCT)RED iPhone 7 and 7 Plus with 40 different designs that turn the red back plate of the housing into an artistic canvas.

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India won’t give in to Apple’s tax break demands

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India
Apple wants to dramatically improve its 2 percent share on the smartphone market in India.
Photo: Tim Cook/Twitter

Apple’s goal of snagging a sizable piece of the growing smartphone market in India may prove more expensive than hoped.

India’s Department of Revenue rebuffed Cupertino’s requests for 15 years’ worth of tax concessions to set up manufacturing facilities, according to published reports. The bad news comes a month before Apple is set to begin building the iPhone SE in that country.

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Meet the artist who turned Apple legalese into a fun comic book

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Terms and Conditions: The Graphic Novel
Watch as Steve Jobs is transformed into a different comic book character while wearing the same clothes.
Photo: R. Sikoryak

Artist Robert Sikoryak has a knack for introducing skittish readers to dense classic literature with comic book adaptions. Try Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment with a 1950s-era Batman with blood on his ax.

But would you consider reading Apple’s terms and conditions user agreement for iTunes as a graphic novel — all 20,699 dry, legalistic words?

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Apple absent from new legal brief opposing Trump’s latest travel ban

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Yeah, we're pretty incredulous about your ideas, too, Mr. Trump.
The brief has been successful despite support from big companies.
Photo: Gage Skidmore/Flickr CC

Apple’s name is notably absent from a new legal brief opposing President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban.

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter, and more than 60 other companies are also missing from the lawsuit that hopes to block a second, “watered-down version” of the controversial executive order.

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Apple tops tech support rankings for third year in a row

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The Genius Bar is one of the best things about buying a Mac.
The Genius Bar is one of the best things about buying a Mac.
Photo: Apple

If you want to get the absolute best tech support for your laptop, pay the Apple tax and get a Mac.

In the latest annual Tech Support Showdown rankings, Laptop Magazine has awarded Apple the number one spot for the third straight year. Apple beat out nine other companies, but it’s starting to get some serious competition from companies like Acer that are focusing more on online service.

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WikiLeaks vows to share CIA ‘cyberweapons’ so tech firms can fix holes

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Wikileaks'
Wikileaks' "Vault 7" data dump allegedly reveals CIA hacking tools used to compromise iPhones, Android phones and other devices.
Image: Gordon Johnson/Pixabay

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has vowed to give technology firms like Apple access to the CIA’s “cyberweapons” arsenal so they can develop fixes that make our devices more secure.

Earlier this week, thousands of leaked documents and files revealed the full extent of the CIA’s cyber attacks on smartphones, computers and even smart TVs. WikiLeaks says the spy agency has lost control of it all in a “historic act of devastating incompetence.”

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