What is Apple’s most important invention? [Friday Night Fights]

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invention
What's your pick?
Photo: Ste Smith/Cult of Mac

Now that all the excitement we had for WWDC has died down, it’s probably time we took a break from iOS 10, macOS Sierra, and all the other things you haven’t been able to avoid over the past couple of weeks. So for this week’s Friday Night Fight, we’re looking at Apple’s history.

We’re focusing on which product has been Apple’s most important throughout the years. Was it the Macintosh that changed personal computing? The iPod that put thousands of songs in your pocket? The iPhone that revolutionized mobile devices?

Join us as we battle it out over Apple’s best ever releases — and which one was most significant!

Get your iPhone ready for summer tunes, pics and trips [Deals]

Exomount
Get in gear with the toys of summer.
Photo: Cult of Mac Deals

Summer’s here, but it’ll be gone before you know it. We’ve got some great gear and gadgets to make sure you get the most juice out of your iPhone before the fall. We’ve got water-resistant earbuds, a sturdy car mount, a set of iPhone camera lenses and a proper Bluetooth boombox. Take a look, and get your iPhone summer-ready:

Netflix to add offline viewing by the end of 2016

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Netflix wants to serve you offline.
Netflix wants to serve you offline.
Photo: Netflix

Netflix is working to bring offline viewing to its smartphone and tablet apps by the end of 2016, according to sources familiar with its plans.

The feature will allow subscribers to save episodes of their favorite shows and feature length movies to their devices and then enjoy them later without a data connection.

Today in Apple history: Original Apple I sells for big bucks at auction

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A working Apple-1 is worth a small fortune these days.
A working Apple 1 will set you back a small fortune.
Photo: Auction Team Breker

Friday24On June 24, 2013, an Apple I — the first ever computer built by Apple Computer, Inc. — was listed for auction by international auction house Christie’s.

Thought to be one of the first 25 units to be built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in the late 1970s, the unit featured no Apple logo, but rather a signature from Woz, who designed the machine. It sold for an impressive $390,000, ranking it among the most expensive computers ever sold.