All items in the category "Business"

Full category list for displayed posts: Business, News

Top Apple execs sell $143 million worth of stock

Tim Cook, Phil Schiller and others sold Apple stock at a time when it was hitting record highs.

Tim Cook, Phil Schiller and others sold Apple stock at a time when it was hitting record highs.

Five top Apple execs — including Tim Cook and Phil Schiller — unloaded $143 million AAPL shares as part of a 10b5-1 planned sale, according to a new report from Barron’s.

Cook sold 348,425 Apple shares for $35,250,297, while Schiller dropped 348,846 shares for $35,256,000.

Other Apple higher-ups who did the same include CFO Luca Maestri, who sold his entire direct holdings for $1,631,286; Jeffrey E. Williams, senior vice president of operations, who raked in $35,233,446; and Bruce D. Sewell, general counsel and senior vice president of legal and government affairs, who made $35,393,915 on the deal.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

Watch Apple’s massive cash hoard pile up in real time

appleprofit

Apple’s massive pile of cash is about to get even bigger this weekend as the the iPhone 6 triggers an avalanche of new upgrades after shattering Apple’s record for pre-orders in a 24 hour period.

Now you can watch Apple’s wealth grow dollar by dollar in real-time, thanks to U.K.-based payments company WorlPayZinc, which built an interactive graph to show how much money the world’s top tech companies are making in real-time. Apple is by far the most profitable company, as it rakes in nearly $51,000 every 8 seconds.

Check out the interactive graph below:

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

7 tips for making your live demo not suck

Myles Weissleder Photo: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

Myles Weissleder of SF New Tech. Portrait: Jim Merithew/Cult of Mac

SAN FRANCISCO — Myles Weissleder has witnessed the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes to startup demos.

The former VP of public affairs at Meetup.com presides over SF New Tech, a showcase for disruptive hopefuls that he’s run for more than eight years. Over 750 companies including SkyBox, Twilio, Prezi, Flipboard and Twitter have come to his networking mixer to demo before a live audience in a trendy SOMA club.

In San Francisco’s competitive startup environment, you can demo your game-changing idea (or Pet Rock app) every night of the week, but SF New Tech is one of the longest-running and largest showcases. Wannapreneurs face a few hundred audience members — many of them from influential companies like Apple or venture capital firms like CMEA capital — where the mingling is fueled by drinks and tacos.

During a recent demo night, Cult of Mac sat down with the indefatigable Weissleder, who is as at home on the stage with a mic as he is hobnobbing at the bar, to get his top tips on how not to bomb when you take the stage with your great idea, hoping to find cash and connect with influencers.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

Killer instincts hide behind Apple’s friendly new face

Time Cook onstage at WWDC 2014. Photo: Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web

Apple seems friendlier these days. But at what cost? Photo: Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web

Apple sure is looking friendlier these days.

This year’s Worldwide Developers Conference was geekier, more welcoming and less locked-down than any in recent history. Apple also bid farewell to Katie Cotton — the much-feared queen of PR, whose frosty relations with journalists made her only slightly less terrifying than an angry Steve Jobs — with a call for a “friendlier, more approachable” public relations face to warm up the company’s relationship with the press.

“For the past few years it’s felt like Apple’s only goal was to put us in our place,” Panic’s Cabel Sasser recently tweeted. “Now it feels like they might want to be friends.”

These recent moves represent a major change in the way Apple does business, even as the company sits atop a $150 billion war chest amassed thanks to innovative products, ruthless leadership and heavy-handed policies that fostered a culture of secrecy and utter domination. But in a world where it’s drummed into our heads that nice guys finish last, does Apple’s approach risk killing the company with kindness?

CEO Tim Cook certainly doesn’t seem to think so.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

iPad Menus Keep It Green At Gordon Ramsay’s Steak In Vegas

image

LAS VEGAS — The wine list at Gordon Ramsay’s Steak restaurant changes so frequently, the servers need iPads to keep up.

The wait staff at the Englishman’s massively popular restaurant are armed with 20 iPads to take wine orders.

Not only does it save paper, it’s the only way to make sure the ever-changing wine list is accurate.

Not only do the sommeliers love it, the customers do too.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

How One Vegas Casino Uses iPads To Loosen Up Gamblers

Spense is an iPad-toting "Beverage Ambassador" at the Rio casino.

Spense is an iPad-toting “Beverage Ambassador” at the Rio casino.

LAS VEGAS — The Rio casino is using iPads to do what casinos do: get visitors drunk and lose money gambling.

Located just off the bustling Vegas strip, the Rio casino has a team of “Beverage Ambassadors,” who wander the casino floor with iPads taking drink orders.

The system has been in place a year now, and it’s so successful, the casino is wondering why the other Vegas gaming joints haven’t copied it.

Here’s how it works:

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

Is Your iPhone 4 Warranty About To Expire? Here Are The Defects To Look Out For

Is Your iPhone 4 Warranty About To Expire? Here Are The Defects To Look Out For

While many of us already have our eyes set on the new iPhone, which Apple will likely release this fall, there are still millions of people using the iPhone 4.

Released on June 24, 2010, the first round of iPhone 4’s are about to hit their two-year anniversary. This means that those who purchased an iPhone 4 along with the AppleCare protection plan, which effectively extends warranty protection to two years, are about to lose coverage.

If you bought an iPhone 4 in the summer of 2010 you should take some time to examine it in order to ensure that no part of it is showing signs of defect. Here’s what you need to know.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

BYOD Is A Great Fit For Small Business

BYOD Is A Great Fit For Small Business

BYOD can help small business attract, retain talented employees

Often discussion around BYOD and mobile management focus on larger companies like IBM and VMWare (both of which have made big bets on BYOD). For larger enterprises, BYOD is a big change for IT professionals and users alike. Testing and transitioning to a BYOD model is filled with culture shock, challenges, and deeply held concerns about data and device security.

For small and mid-size businesses, however, the experience can be very different. That’s to be expected since smaller IT departments are often more tightly integrated with staff taking on multiple roles and less delineation of duties and job functions. Often this leads small business IT to be more agile and more engaged with the rest of the organization.

According to Nasstar, small businesses are employing BYOD in large numbers and with positive results.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

Survey Shows iPads, BYOD Are Big Hits For Small Business

Survey Shows iPads, BYOD Are Big Hits For Small Business

Small business survey shows strong tablet and BYOD trends

The iPad’s status in larger enterprise businesses is nothing sort of spectacular – it pretty much is the entire enterprise tablet market. As great as that is for Apple, the company has put a lot of effort into courting small and mid-size companies – Lion Server being one example.

According to a new study, that effort is paying off as more than half of small businesses have begun integrating the iPad or some form of tablet.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »

Blogger Shows Us How It’s Done – Wins Suit Against Apple Over Defective MacBook Pro

Blogger Shows Us How It’s Done – Wins Suit Against Apple Over Defective MacBook Pro

A few years back Seattle Rex had gone all out on a 17” MacBook Pro – spending approximately $4,500 on the then top-of-the-line machine ($5,100 including AppleCare). The particular MacBook Pro he bought turned out to be defective. The laptop’s Nvidia graphics processor started displaying symptoms of the defect shortly after his AppleCare expired. A few days later the laptop died completely – it wouldn’t even start up. At the time Rex’s laptop broke down the defect was a known and well-documented issue. Apple had even issued a tech note and was replacing defective models as they failed.

Read the rest of this iBusiness Report post »