iOS 5 Will Warn You If Hackers Try To Intercept Your Voice Calls

iOS 5 Will Warn You If Hackers Try To Intercept Your Voice Calls

Think talking on your iPhone is safe? Think again: hackers and data thieves can intercept your phone calls under iOS 4. That’s why Apple’s rolling out a new feature in iOS 5: a warning that pops up when you engage in a so-called ‘unsecured call.’”

The message text of the notification says: “The cellular network you are using is not encrypted. This call can be intercepted by unauthorized listeners.”

How can a call on your phone network be unsecured? It all has to do with something called an IMSI catcher, a fake GSM base station that is designed to trick a target handset into sending you its voice traffic. Obviously, this approach doesn’t work on Verizon’s CDMA network, but for most of the world’s iPhone owners, it’s a potential vulnerability… even if it’s not one that is particularly likely to be exploited.

So next time you’re talking to your girlfriend on your iPhone and hear someone breathing heavily in the background, just count down the days until iOS 5.

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  • Bob

    “warn you if hackers try to intercept your voice calls”

    It does no such thing.  More bullshit linkbait from Perez Brownlee.

  • c.t

    Excuse your language sir… Don’t be mean to the authors of this absolutely awesome web site

  • Lemonfizz

    well this should help the terrorists, drug dealers and tax dodgers nicely

  • Jakob Staune Bakmann

    yeah yeah thats great but……. WTF IS THAT CYDIA IN THE LEFT CORNER!?! HAS IT BEN JAILBROKEN!??!?!?!?!?

  • Jakob Staune Bakmann

    oh sorry… right corner :S

  • Jose Rodriguez

    Don’t like bob’s response but he’s right. Encryption doesn’t alert you on the spot, it’s preset security.

  • dnyank1

    yea it has.

  • Respighifan

    Ahem…a 17-year-old kid from turkey hacked the iOS5 only one day after its intro. That is the one BIG issue with Apple: its iOS in any manifestation is not secure enough to fend off what it needs to in order to remove RIM from the enterprise table.http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/techn… is not Apple’s raison d’etre, as it were, but it is a cornerstone of RIM’s value proposition. Obviously, Apple needs to work in this area.

  • ichiroa

    I got this message on my iPhone today! (im at wwdc)

  • cheesy11

    hmm think you need to read up abit perez

  • Aufdenschlips

    rofl

    RIM had to hand over access keys to governments of several countries because they threatened to shut down their service

  • Respighifan

    Excuse me, but remember I am talking about enterprise’s need to fend off hackers, security breach attacks, etc. The reason RIM worked out deals with the governments is so that they would comply with the laws and national security requirements of each country. They did not hand out “access keys” carte blanche either.
    Also note that RIM’s security was too powerful for those country’s governments to break – Apple is so hackable it is ridiculous.

    Point is RIM is hands down superior in security – Apple owns RIM in many other ways.

  • Aufdenschlips

    ok, believe what you want to believe

    they had to hand over access to their encrypted communication, e.g. saudi arabia

    meaning the governments of these countries can access ANY information on the RIM network in their respective countries without RIM having a say in the matter, it does mean they had to hand over access keys or otherwise install a means for these governments to have access to their network AT ALL TIMES

    apple till now had no encrypted messaging service as such

    and even without it quite many medium to large businesses are phasing out their RIMs

    just keep on ignoring worldwide news if you need to so badly

    and re hackackble

    everything is hackable, RIM was never the target of such a huge FANBASE that wanted to explore the innards and add functionality themselves

    and untethered jailbreak seems to be thing of the past, according to 1conic

    RIM is a symbol for the top down approach, e.g. windows, where the user is considered a necessity you have to deal with and not a valued customer

    when people in general come to the conclusion that a business only takes their money and ignores them afterwards it will begin to fail

    people in general seem quite fed up with RIM

    a lot of RIM´s customers feel they are forced to stick with them because till now they were by large the only provider of such a service

    apple excels in refining ideas in such a way that it seems as an almost new product because of added functionality and integration with other services and products they offer

  • Respighifan

    Sigh – it has nothing to do with “believe what you want to believe” –  I agreed that RIM granted access to governments, but it was not cart blanche. All companies Apple, MSFT etc have to abide by the regulations concerning access to data in each country, so the point is moot. 
    My point is that in terms of security the RIM solution is by far the strongest – on that there is no disagreement, otherwise Apple and Android phones would have invaded the enterprise and government sectors far sooner.
    Which leads me to what I said, that is that Apple owns RIM in many other ways – I believe we agree on that, looking at your post.

  • Aufdenschlips

    sigh as well, get your facts straight

    in several countries, e.g. saudi arabia, the government has carte blanche

    and rim is losing customers in droves

    apple is alerting users in ios 5 if a so called imsi catcher is being used, in most cases by a government agency

    rim is telling it’s customers wether their communication is less secure in the same moment that it got compromised

  • Aufdenschlips

    sigh as well, get your facts straight

    in several countries, e.g. saudi arabia, the government has carte blanche

    and rim is losing customers in droves

    apple is alerting users in ios 5 if a so called imsi catcher is being used, in most cases by a government agency

    rim is telling it’s customers wether their communication is less secure in the same moment that it got compromised

About the author

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his wife and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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