Insiders: Apple’s iCloud Will The First Step Towards Making $0.99 Downloads Archaic

Insiders: Apple’s iCloud Will The First Step Towards Making $0.99 Downloads Archaic

Good things come to those who wait. While Google and Amazon rushed to offer simple cloud storage services, Apple apparently was working on something bigger. Much bigger. Get ready for iCloud, a full-featured service streaming your iTunes collection to your iPhone, iPad – eventually even your car.

“Apple will be able to scan customers’ digital music libraries in iTunes and quickly mirror their collections on its own servers,” reports BusinessWeek after talking with three insiders. Additionally, if your songs’ quality isn’t up to snuf, Apple will provide a higher-quality version for streaming.

What do the music labels and publishers get for agreeing to Apple’s plan? A Netflix-like future. As the DVD-by-mail service found great success in converting to video streaming, the ailing music industry will have new revenue from monthly subscriptions and new ties to cable providers, according to the report.

“We will come to a point in the not-so-distant future when we’ll look back on the 99-cent download as anachronistic as cassette tapes and 8-tracks,” predicts Ross Crupnick, music analyst with retail forecaster NPD Group. Crupnick is right, of course. Like the iPad breathed new life into the tablet computer, iCloud will euthanize the tired digital music landscape, replacing it with a future wide with possibilities.

  • andymcclung

    Can’t wait!

  • PbF

    what a bloody stupid idea.

  • tk422

    So let me get this straight. My music will be in the cloud? I won’t be able to download a copy, just stream it? And I’ll have to pay monthly to access it? And with Comcast restricting my bandwidth I’ll either not have access, or will have to pay twice? And on top of that, if my connection goes out I won’t have access to my own music – at all.

    And this is a good idea?

    F(*&k off.

  • prof_peabody

    That graphic is embarrassingly bad.  

    Also, it won’t be as magical as people think.  There is still the problem of all the music that isn’t in iTunes or that the various record companies don’t want you to buy because you are in the wrong country or it’s a different version etc. I would imagine at least two thirds of my iTunes library won’t “match” anything on the iTunes servers in my country, but it’s still all legally bought and paid for.  

    Also, there are a lot of folks who don’t want to stream music from the cloud, or who need to store it locally, or who just like “owning” it, or, or …

    People will still be buying music and movies for years.  

  • sj1973

    Nailed it.  Given Apple’s terrible track record of designing user experience I’m sure you’ve thought it through  more than they have.  

  • Bill Olson

    ““We will come to a point in the not-so-distant future when we’ll look back on the 99-cent download as anachronistic as cassette tapes and 8-tracks,” predicts Ross Crupnick, music analyst with retail forecaster NPD Group. Crupnick is right, of course. Like the iPad breathed new life into the tablet computer, iCloud will euthanize the tired digital music landscape, replacing it with a future wide with possibilities.”

    WRONG. What this points to is that music you buy for 69 cents, 99 cents or $1.29 (USD) will be streamed to your device if you so choose. It does NOT mean the end of 99 cent songs.

    This is a case of adding up blue and car and getting two. Two totally different things, one coming from Apple, the other out of this person’s rear end, and coming up with an answer that is just plain stupid to come up with.

  • Bill Olson

    We will continue to buy songs like we have been doing. What will change is that will will have the option to pay to stream those songs, the ones we have paid for already, to our devices.

  • Jay Max

    I’m still fascinated by the idea that the record industry is excited by this being an additional income stream.  After all, I must be completely missing the point, if I carry an iPhone, I have a lot of my music with me.  Why do I want to pay for the privilege of listening to music I already own, somewhere else?  Can’t I just use my iPhone still?  

    Ooh!  I can listen to it in my car!  I do that now with iPhone.  Do you really want people fiddling with their ENTIRE music collection in their car?

    Also, how will it antiquate .99 purchases?  I still have to purchase my songs that get added to the cloud.  Unless it’s like the ala carte plans that already exist.

    Hopefully you guys can clear this up, so I can understand the appeal of this cloud.

  • Tiago Oliveira

    If you switch the name iCloud to Spotify, I could think the article was about Spotify. Looking fwd to see what Apple has to show!

  • Fitz

    I can’t remember the last time I bought a song off of iTunes for $0.99 anyways.  It seems like everything I’m interested in is $1.29…

  • Ian McPhee

    It seems like an interesting idea to me. I am not particularly interested in music but am in favour of using this system for movies and tv shows. I like the idea I can watch what I want without having to go home and re-sync my collection. However, a subscription fee for the cloud service better be worth it though, and as long as it doesn’t change the way I buy dvd’s (and ripping them to itunes) or how i use the itunes store then I’ll be happy. 

    One qualm I have though is the term “iTunes”… I think, considering how much it does now, that a new name like iMedia (or something similar) is far more relevant. 

  • balpjfnwfg@mailinator.com

    yep, it’s the Windows 95 cloud background. embarrassing.
    http://www.google.com/search?t

  • m3kw

    Relax, they are not stupid and as stupid as you to actually think they can completely cut off downloadable music to your iPods.

About the author

Ed SutherlandEd Sutherland is a veteran technology journalist who first heard of Apple when they grew on trees, Yahoo was run out of a Stanford dorm and Google was an unknown upstart. Since then, Sutherland has covered the whole technology landscape, concentrating on tracking the trends and figuring out the finances of large (and small) technology companies.

(sorry, you need Javascript to see this e-mail address)| Read more posts by .

Posted in News, Top stories | Tagged: , , |