Qwiki + iPad: The Future of Information Distribution

Qwiki, a startup offering a new way to get informed, won the $50,000 first prize and Disrupt Cup at the 2010 TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco on Wendesday.

Founded by Doug Imbruce, a self-described recovering software engineer, and Louis Monier, sometimes called the Father of Web Search for his role as the founder of AltaVista, Qwiki has the ubernerd community all aflutter over the prospects for its automagical transformation of the way we search for and obtain information. Combining text, audio, video, and images presented together in a seamless interface, Qwiki is meant to generate dynamic movies of whatever a user searches for.

The company’s software is designed to run on the web as well as in apps on mobile devices. Qwiki crawls data covering millions of topics and presents it to a user in an engaging and visual way, which, as it turns out, plays quite nicely with the super-portable, visually oriented attributes of the iPad.

The company’s official presentation at TCDisrupt showed only a concept video of an iPhone wake-up app based on the service, and a working prototype running on a laptop in Flash. As the video above shows, however, their iPad prototype that remains in development offers tantalizing possibilities.

The software engineer who showed this little glimpse backstage at the conference seemed pretty stoked about it, anyway.

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About the author

Lonnie Lazar

Lonnie Lazar is a writer-musician-web designer-attorney. He writes about Apple for Cult of Mac and Mac|Life, and about VoIP and telecommunications for Voxilla. Follow Lonnie on Twitter @LonnieLazar, join the Cult of Mac on Facebook, and find Lonnie's photos on Flickr.

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