Author: Kindle eBooks Outselling Apple iBooks 60-to-1

Author: Kindle eBooks Outselling Apple iBooks 60-to-1

Remember back in June when Apple told developers the iBookstore had 22 percent of the eBook market? An author who uses both platforms to market his writing is now telling a vastly-different story. He sells 200 Kindle ebooks each day, compared to 100 a month for the iPad’s iBooks.

Despite the Kindle ebooks not currently supporting color or video, like the ebooks via Apple’s iBookstore, “according to my numbers Apple is a very small part of the ebook market,” blogs author Joe Konrath. “I sell 200 ebooks a day on Kindle. On iPad, I sell 100 a month,” he adds.

The numbers seem closer to figures released earlier this month on the ebook market. Amazon’s Kindle Store had 61 percent of the market, while Barnes & Noble had 20 percent and Sony had five percent, according to the Bowker study. Although Apple was not listed, the Cupertino, Calif. company’s ebook efforts apparently registered fewer than five percent of the market.

In terms of ebook readers, Amazon’s Kindle had 40 percent of the market, with reading ebooks on your computer coming in second most popular.

[AllThingsD, Joe Konrath, Electronista]

  • Erik Corr

    For some weird reason the Ibook version of my novel for the first few weeks sold and now the Kindle version is sellingĀ  and not the ibook version

  • Michael Fournier

    Number one reason NO Desktop/Laptop support for apples ibooks even if you have a Apple laptop or iMac I say SHAME on Apple to try and boost iPad sales this way Even if I do buy a iPad I STILL want to read the same books on my macbook or iMac as well it is simply STUPID and Short sighted by Apple. As a example had Apple limited iTunes music to just iPod playback instead of allowing you to play Music and movies on you Mac or PC using iTunes iTunes music store would have failed. Apple Why did you not learn from your iTunes music sales and apply that to iBook sales?

About the author

Ed SutherlandEd Sutherland is a veteran technology journalist who first heard of Apple when they grew on trees, Yahoo was run out of a Stanford dorm and Google was an unknown upstart. Since then, Sutherland has covered the whole technology landscape, concentrating on tracking the trends and figuring out the finances of large (and small) technology companies.

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