Booq’s new Boa Flow Graphite looks like a bag that might finally carry everything, anywhere

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You’ve probably noticed Booq’s odd penchant for naming their strange, sophisticated baggage after snakes. And if you’ve really been paying attention, you’ll have noticed variations on one species crop up over and over again: The Booq Boa.

The Boa’s DNA has mutated into a variety of different forms, all with the purpose of carrying a MacBook and associated equipment. But the newest iteration, the Boa Flow Graphite, may be the most perfect yet — especially for those of us who lug a MacBook and DSLR on adventures.

This time, it looks like Booq nailed it. The BFG’s most distinctive feature is a main compartment that hides a foam divider designed to house a DSLR, with a zippered opening on the bottom so the the camera can be quickly retrieved. For DSLR-free days, the rigid foam divider can be removed, and the pocket squashed to make more room for a bulky jacket or an extra lunchbox. Perfect.

But that’s just the first feature of many that Booq’s pocket-crazed designers added to the bag. Naturally, there’s a well-padded laptop compartment that’ll fit 15-inch MBPs; side flaps to organize peripherals (one of which fits a water-bottle); a large, slim front pocket for quick access to documents; and a small soft-lined top pocket for sunglasses or an iPhone. And that’s not counting the myriad internal pockets (see: pocket-crazed).

The whole thing is coated in water-repellent DWR coating to keep the rain rolling off (though it doesn’t look like it’s actually waterproof). And like many of Booq’s bags, it comes with a Terralinq tag that may help you find it if it ever gets lost.

The Booq Boa Flow Graphite is available now, and will set you back a hefty $225.

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The Booq Boa Flow Graphite’s removable camera pocket.

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About the author

Eli MilchmanWhen he was eight, Eli Milchman came home from frolicking in the Veld one day and was given an Atari 400. Since then, his fascination with technology has made him an intrepid early adopter of whatever charming new contraption crosses his path — which explains why he's Cult of Mac's test editor-at-large. He calls San Francisco home, where he works as a journalist and photographer. Eli has contributed to the pages of Wired.com and BIKE Magazine, among others. Hang with him on Twitter.

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