Schiller Says Samsung Has ‘Caused People To Question’ Apple Innovations

Phil-Schiller-iPad-mini

Phil Schiller took to the stand yesterday for the second day of Apple’s latest patent trial with Samsung.

Schiller mostly rehashed the same defense he used when the two companies met in court last November, also over a patent dispute — namely that Apple was the company which took the risk developing the iPhone, and that Samsung’s copying has hurt the company.

“I believe it has caused damage for Apple in the marketplace,” Schiller said. “It has caused people to question some of the innovations we’ve created and Apple’s role as the innovator. That challenge is made harder in the copying.”

He also referred to the iPad as a “bet the company” product, but evaded questions about the five patents involved with the current court case — saying “That’s not my area of expertise” when asked about particular patent claims.

Seven patents are involved in the current court case, including unlocking touch-screens using gestures, automatically correcting words being typed, retrieving data sought by users, and performing actions on found data — such as making a call after coming up with a phone number. Because U.S. patent litigation is slow, the trial concerns 2012 and pre-2012 patents.

The previous Apple vs. Samsung trial ended with a jury deciding that Samsung owed Apple more than $1 billion in damaging for infringing on patents — although this number was later trimmed to $929 million.

Should Apple emerge victorious this time it could result in an even larger amount of damages awarded. Apple is reportedly demanding Samsung pay a hefty $40 royalty for each allegedly infringing device. This would mean that total damages could be in excess of five times the amount sought in previous trials.

  • AAPL_@_$101_Is_A_Done_Deal_:)

    Schiller’s not kidding. Apple went from being considered a pretty decent device manufacturer to a company that is said to be manufacturing out-of-date products that are no longer cutting edge. Apple gets absolutely no respect from the computer industry or Wall Street. The company is being constantly attacked by the news media for selling overpriced products that don’t have the latest hardware like the Android manufacturers do. Android has dozens of companies building all types of smartphones with some that have super specs in one area but weak in others. However, the iPhone is supposed to match every smartphone in order to be considered good. That’s impossible to do. Samsung is pumping out smartphones like crazy. Although it’s great for Samsung, it shouldn’t have to be considered bad for Apple.

    Every time Samsung comes out with a new flagship smartphone that has the kitchen sink included it is immediately compared with the iPhone which isn’t built to be a tech-head’s dream device. Now everything component Samsung puts into a smartphone, Apple is supposed to match it spec for spec or be considered behind-the-times. Apple products are completely different from Samsung products as iPhones and iPads are well-constructed and simple to use. That is no longer considered fashionable to the industry pundits. Average consumers are happy with Apple products but that isn’t considered good enough for the tech-heads anymore. Apple is now totally screwed as a value company.

    • Nick V

      So you are upset that Samsung is putting out more devices, which is making Apple look bad? Isn’t it Apple’s choice to put out more devices, or not to do so?

      Apple’s iOS rarely changes from one version to the next. Their version 7 was pretty much lipstick on a pig, where they used the new icons and themes as more of a feature, meanwhile they are on their 7th iteration because they never focused on bugs.

      By copying Samsung and other Android OEs, they have created a phone that no longer lasts a full day, as I hear a ton of complaints from my friends.

      Your biggest compliment to apple devices is their build quality… And that is also your disappointment with the industry.

      Your entire statement is nothing but I wish Apple could compete with Samsung statements. So my advice to you is to switch to Samsung. It is a better phone than Apple could ever make, even with the plastic.

      • HanSolo1970

        Seriously? Samsung’s ENTIRE business model is built around blatantly copying other companies’ product lines, from phones to refrigerators to vacuum cleaners to televisions. They’re being sued on multiple fronts by companies like Dyson. That’s a pattern of behavior that can’t be denied. They’re incapable of innovating on their own.

      • Jacob

        I agree, Samsung has done nothing but copying. If they don’t start innovating (which they can’t) they will eventually file for bankruptcy due to all the lawyer debts. They clearly got the watch idea from people rumoring about Apple releasing an iWatch. They clearly don’t innovate like they say they do. I honestly don’t think apple is trying to eliminate competition. Think of it this way: you spent time and money designing something, so you patent it. Then some idiot comes over and copies it. Would you sit there and watch your product being copied and the copier making money? I don’t think so. This is exactly what is happening to Apple.

        Before you pull the “Apple is eliminating the competition” card, think of what I said.

      • Nick V

        So who designed rounded corners? Who designed the pinch to zoom? Who designed the iPhone’s gimmicks 20 years prior?

        Bill Gates had a tablet in the early 90s when he was on stage for one of Microsoft’s Conferences, almost 2 decades before Apple had the iPad.

        Apple is a big baby who cannot handle the competition. Android is Open Source, which stymies the efforts of Apple going after Google. This is the same reason why Microsoft could not go after Linux for the last few decades.

        Apple is pursuing one vendor only. Out of all the Android OEs, Samsung is the only one. Why? They have the most money, that’s why. LG has rounded corners, they have icons that look foolish, somewhat like iOS, but there is no money.

      • Kr00

        Funny how many others are pursuing Samescum, just like Apple are doing? That should tell you something. But I gather nothing will convince you that your beloved Samescum are nothing more than a giant copying business. Ask Mr Dyson, Sony, BB about what they think of them.

      • Wiley Townsend

        Dude, Apple released a tablet available to consumers in the 80’s then Microsoft had that one, then the iPad. Check your facts.

      • Nick V

        How’s your notification shade working out for you? Copy much? The fonts on iOS7??? Looks exactly like Jellybean and KitKat… Copy Much? how about that Control Center on iOS? Copy Much?

        Get off your high horse, because the iPhone copied the LG Prada as the basis for the deign of the iPhone.

      • Kr00

        You seem to forget Android was working solely on a keyboard smart phone before the iPhone came out, and low and behold, 9 months later, they rushed a lame touchscreen phone out. Funny also that Eric Schmit was on the board of Apple at the time also. Funny that Steve Jobs banned him from product discussions after that, then accused google of stealing Apple OS, he would know, right? Lets not be all high and mighty, we know who has stolen from who.

      • Nick V

        Let’s not forget that Job’s built his company on copying, and even stated it publicly. Goes something like Good artists copy… Great Artists… What was that?

      • Jacob

        Proof that he said that or it didn’t happen.

      • HanSolo1970

        Nick, it’s okay to like Android, or to prefer Apple for that matter. It’s just that what Samsung has copied far outshines anything Apple has done. You can’t use the excuse that because someone stole a pack of gum at the supermarket that you should be able to rob a bank. Your arguments are actually pretty old in the Apple press. Fact is, companies copy Apple’s take on products because Apple has their finger on the pulse of what consumers want. Period.

        Open source is good? Not always. I’m a teacher. Every student in my school is issued an iPad in a one-to-one program. It could never be an Android tablet for the very reason that it IS open. It goes against “SAVE” legislation in NY State. Guess what? Many schools in our area of the country are moving toward digital classrooms and ALL of them are using iPads because it is a closed garden for academics involving our children. That’s an awful big chunk of the market closed to Android products because of their “openness” and vulnerabilities to malware.

      • Don Zamifaro

        Nonsense – just because Android is open, doesn’t mean it can’t be secured for students to use. Quick google search comes up with dozens of resources on that.

      • HanSolo1970

        Wrong.

      • Don Zamifaro

        Well ok, if HanSolo says Android is insecure, then that’s that I guess! Wow, that also means all those kiosks that use Android can now be hacked into it.. even if they use this type of software:
        https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.gears42.surelock

        Thanks Hanny. Now go back to your hole in the ground.

      • Don Zamifaro

        Plenty of android tablets are used in secure mode as kiosks, and used in plenty of schools too. You, and your school, needs to get up to date with technology it seems.

      • HanSolo1970

        Sorry, but you’re just plain wrong. Android is not secure in a school setting. If you actually worked in education you might be up to date with the stringent technology requirements required. SAVE legislation automatically rules out use of Android tablets.

      • Don Zamifaro

        http://www.tabpilot.com/

        That’s one link showing software designed for/used by schools that lock down android tablets. There are hundreds more. Your school is not the only one in existence.

      • Don Zamifaro

        Wow, your ignorance shows no limits. A quick google search of Android tablets for Schools shows plenty of links to competing software for Android which locks down the tablet for school settings (eg tabpilot, the second link). You might want to consider you & your school just aren’t up to date with technology.

      • HanSolo1970

        Ignorance? You humor me. It takes someone ignorant to want to attempt to go through all the half-assed work-arounds required to get Android to actually be somewhat secure. Does Google send a rep to set up Android? No? Well, we have our own Apple rep who personally comes to our school if there are any issues. Apple actually gives a damn about it’s customers’ experiences, especially in education. Where’s Android’s iTunes U? iOS just plain works at all levels, it’s better integrated, and is far more elegant.

      • Don Zamifaro

        So you’ve moved away from “Android is not secure” to, “Android is somewhat secure”. I’ve educated you. Your welcome.

      • HanSolo1970

        Still not worth using. You’re welcome.

      • old_school

        I like Android and i like iOS too and all Apple products, but get your facts straight! iPhone was oficially released June 29, 2007, Android user interface was lame at the beggining using hardware keyboard and Google at that point didn’t even had a final product until the end of 2008 so what are you all babbling about? iOS stole from Android my ass, it’s vice versa!

      • Guest

        I like Android and i like iOS and all Apple products, but get your facts straight! iPhone was oficially released June 29, 2007, Android user interface was lame at the beggining using hardware keyboard and Google at that point didn’t even had a final product until the end of 2008 so what are you all babbling about? iOS stole from Android my ass, it’s vice versa!

    • 2dOpinion

      This whole idea about “Samesong” being a “tech head” device compared to iOS is laughable. If having to drill through layer upon layer of misplaced controls and settings is a Samesong claim to fame, it’s a pretty weak one. Simplicity, elegance, reliability and SECURITY any day. On that Apple delivers and they’ll keep on delivering. PS I’m no “average consumer” either…

    • Yunik

      But even with high spec they are not getting close to the performance and camera specs are not what people see they see performance and things which they need but even though so many have bought it more then any android phone so just shut your mouth

    • Don Zamifaro

      Fair enough – except that if “average consumers” are happy with Apple then there should be nothing for Apple to be concerned about? Yes, Apple will find it tough to compete with dozens of others, but thats the choice they take (and always have taken)… didn’t let other companies use MacOS on their own hardware, so they all licensed Windows instead… same road, different time.

  • http://twitter.com/gettysburg11s gettysburg11s

    Schiller has been drinking too much of his own cool-aid. I am huge Apple fan, but come on. What Apple wants is no real competition so that they look better than anyone else. Samsung provides Apple with the competition they need, so that they don’t sit on their hands and rake in the money. Maybe the popularity of Samsung smartphones will get Apple to take competition seriously in the smartphone arena. They still have tablets in the bag, but smartphones? Its starting to slip from their fingers…

    • Nick V

      Samsung tablet sales jumped 137% in 2013, while Apple only a few points. While Apple is still ahead in percentage points, Samsung has a real good chance of passing Apple in tablet sales this year.

    • Tom Gibson

      It’s not real competition when a company is copying your products. How do you compete with theft?

      • Davyd

        I can’t think of anything Apple has that is not something that already existed before they made it/used it.

      • Ilja Shebalin

        Correct. But isn’t it interesting that technologies designed earlier got the second chance when just Apple impregnated them and turned to something consumable?

        Also interesting that by such comments those who confess such vulgar, oversimplified views of who’s significant inventing one or another “device” are not even trying to deny copyright violations (by Samsung, in this case.)

  • Nick V

    So as Apple begins to flirt with even bigger screen sizes, does that mean Apple is copying from Samsung? Samsung had bigger screens before Apple, right?

  • old_school

    Yes Apple devices are overpriced, but at the same time they are innovators, distinguished brand and if they do copycat they use reliable technology unlike some other companies out there. Majority of people spit on Apple cause they can’t afford it and that’s a fact and that’s what hurts them!

    • site7000

      Total-of-cost-of-ownership studies have shown Apple to be the cheapest brand over the long haul. Reduced service costs and higher resale value have a lot to do with it. You get quality and savings together.

      And what’s often overlooked is that Apple pays for other companies’ patents.
      For example, all the Macintosh UI elements that Apple got from Xerox
      PARC were fully licensed and Xerox made a hefty amount from them. So
      the alleged “steal” quote from Jobs really has nothing to attach itself
      to. Apple also licenses many of its patents to other companies on
      reasonable terms, such as HTC just recently. But Samsung is so fixated
      on copying that they refuse to pay for licenses on principle–they are
      just pathological on the topic. Not to mention, of course, that when the
      rubber meets the road in the courtroom on who is copying whom, Apple is
      kicking Samsung’s ass.

      Apple’s competition have to give their products away virtually at cost, so people who focus on short term savings will always be attracted by the price tag, at least at first. But people who know value when they see it are willing to pay a fair price for a great product. It’s cheaper in the long run and more fun and useful along the way.

      • old_school

        Yep, that’s about it. :-)

      • Don Zamifaro

        Licensed from Xerox .. what, after Xerox took them to court?

      • old_school

        Xerox already had a working graphic workstation at that time for a year or so and they didn’t bother to protect their licence or to continue with the development of it. Jobs came, saw and connected all the little dots and made a final product called Lisa from them, what’s so strange about it?

About the author

Luke DormehlLuke Dormehl is a UK-based journalist and author, with a background working in documentary film for Channel 4 and the BBC. He is the author of The Formula: How Algorithms Solve All Our Problems, And Create More and The Apple Revolution, both published by Penguin/Random House. His tech writing has also appeared in Wired, Fast Company, Techmeme, and other publications. He'd like you a lot if you followed him on Twitter.

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