Steve Jobs Treated His Cancer At Veggie Restaurant?

Steve Jobs Treated His Cancer At Veggie Restaurant?

On Tuesday morning Steve Jobs will take the stage to deliver one of his singular infomercials. He’s expected to introduce a new iPod, but the only thing I care about is how healthy he looks. Sod the iPod, how’s Steve Jobs?

Jobs’ health has been the burning issue surrounding Apple this year. The company is firing on all cylinders (except the odd glitch like MobileMe) but the CEO’s health is an ongoing issue of extreme concern that will not go away. All eyes on Tuesday will be looking to see how healthy Jobs looks –and fingers crossed he’s OK.

After the jump: did Jobs treat his cancer at Greens veggie restaurant in SF?

Steve Jobs Treated His Cancer At Veggie Restaurant?


CC Pic by reinvented

Steve Jobs Treated His Cancer At Veggie Restaurant?

CC Pic: Joi Ito

Earlier this year, Fortune magazine revealed that after Steve Jobs discovered he had pancreatic cancer in October 2003, he tried to treat it by undergoing a special diet. But after nine months, when this failed to be a cure, he underwent surgery in July 2004. Four years later, he appears to be cancer free.

It now appears that Jobs’ special diet was conducted in part at Greens, a popular vegetarian restaurant in San Francisco, and he was often accompanied by Dr. Dean Ornish, the bestselling author of “Eat more, Weigh Less” and a clinical professor of medicine at University of California, San Francisco.

According to two staff who worked at Greens, and who asked to remain anonymous, Jobs regularly met Dr. Ornish at Greens about four years ago. Both staffers said they got the impression Jobs was trying to treat his cancer with meals eaten at Greens.

“Steve Jobs was always in there with his doctor,” said one.”He was treating his cancer.”

Amazing though this is — I’m a little skeptical. Neither staffer could have known at the time that Jobs had cancer: his condition was a closely-guarded secret. Both staffers must have learned about Jobs’ cancer from press reports, and then formed their conclusions.

In addition, both staffers said Jobs frequently ate at the restaurant, often with Dr. Ornish, but sometimes with his wife and sometimes as part of a larger party. Both stuck to their cancer treatment stories, however.

On one occasion Jobs told the server he wanted his meal prepared without pans.

“No pans,” he told the waiter. Puzzled, the waiter asked how the meal could possibly be prepared without pans?

Jobs said he didn’t know, but repeated that he wanted his meal cooked without pans. Nonplussed, the server simply put the order through to the kitchen without mentioning the “no pans” instructions. Luckily, when the meal was served, Jobs ate it without question, the staffer said.

“He was assertive, but not an asshole,” the staffer said.

Jobs ordered food from Greens’ standard menu, both staff said, and rarely had special requests, except for “no pans” of course. Neither staffer could remember him drinking.

Another San Francisco restaurateur, who works at a popular eatery in the East Bay, said he’s frequently served Jobs at his restaurant and catered parties and events.

Jobs is polite, courteous and tips well.

“He’s always a perfect gentleman,” the restaurateur said.

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  • doug A

    the “no pans” is most surely about Steve trying to avoid the Teflon coating (polytetrafluoroethylene) on non-stick pans. that stuff has been shown to cause cancer. But, do not try and get info like that out to the masses or John Dupont and his hi-powered rifle will some after you!

  • veggiedude

    Obviously they misunderstood. They thought Jobs said “no pan” when in actuality he said “no pot” – and he wasn’t referring to utensils.

    Now I know certain people on cancer treatment believe pot works for them, and I’m sure that is true, but Steve Jobs doesn’t do it. Not anymore.

  • Craig Grannell

    “Steve Jobs was always in there with his doctor,” said one. ”He was treating his cancer.”

    Heh. Nothing to do with the fact Steve doesn’t eat meat and may actually like this place. (Well, ‘liked’ might be more accurate now, clearly.)

  • web

    Lookin’ forward to the announcement of the iPan Touch tomorrow.

  • Peter Gardiner

    Clearly Dr. Ornish was a failure in this case. He is wishy washy at best but he has enormous support from the medical profession.  Steve’s diet was out of balance and nobody put it staight. Sad.

  • bartvb

    So have broccoli and olive oil

  • Vincent Maldia

    Dr. Ornish is controversial for trying to push flawed scientific studies as evidence

    http://www.tweetdeck.com/twitt

About the author

Leander KahneyLeander Kahney is the editor and publisher of Cult of Mac. He is the NYT bestselling author of Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple's Greatest Products; Inside Steve’s Brain; Cult of Mac; and Cult of iPod. Leander has written for Wired, MacWeek, Scientific American, and The Guardian in London. Follow Leander on Twitter @lkahney and Facebook.

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