Apple Reiterates Commitment To Good Products, Says More Are Coming This Fall

Given how secretive Apple is, "new products" is about as specific as its executives are going to get.

Given Apple’s level of secrecy, executives won’t get more specific than “new products,” and it’s getting boring.

Apple’s third quarter earnings call didn’t produce many interesting comments from the company’s executives, but CFO Peter Oppenheimer and CEO Tim Cook did mention new products coming in the fall. But then again, Apple has been beating the same “stuff is coming” drum all year.

When asked a philosophical question about how Apple operates, Cook reiterated the company’s mantra on manufacturing quality gear.

“We’re here to make good products,” said Cook. “We think that if we focus on that and do that really well, the financial metrics will come. We start at the product because we believe that the most important thing is that our customers love the products and want them.”

“Apple needs more unpredictability these days, not less.”

Since Apple hasn’t had a major new product all year, everyone is anxious about how the company will perform during the upcoming holiday season.

“Our key catalysts will always be new products and new services in existing and new categories,” said Cook. Apple has said that new products are coming this fall multiple times, and “new categories” means something beyond the iPhone, iPad and Mac. (iWatch, anyone?)

Earnings calls used to be exciting times to cover Apple, but the company is starting to get pretty boring. Cook and Co. are sticking to a set of bland, boilerplate responses that give hardly any insight into the future of the company.

Steve Jobs had a way of remaining secretive but also being unpredictable and interesting. Apple needs more unpredictability these days, not less. Actions speak louder than words, so we’ll see how its upcoming offerings are received this fall.

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  • i_phone

    Alex – Tim Cook & Apple don’t want to share their secrets with you – grow some patience and get over it!

  • i_phone

    One more note – As a stockholder, I would rather have Apple secretive than have them give the competition a head start. This is especially pertinent when history has shown us that other well-known companies (READ: Samsung & Google) have a tendency to copy Apple’s products.

    Last note – Apple’s secrecy provides it with a massive amount of free press coverage when it comes time to releasing new product categories or upgrading existing lines. Not only is that worth millions in advertising dollars, but more importantly it puts pressure on the consumer to join in when all they see on the web are these new shiny products.

    Let’s get real here, Alex. There’s a reason why Apple is so secretive. I’d worry less about your boredom and fixation on Steve Jobs and instead focus on worthwhile articles that add value.

  • MrsCleaver

    Any way you choose a more flattering… or at least fresher or more realistic photo of Tim Cook doing his job? This one shows up on C-of-M from time to time, making him look like he’s praying, even lamenting. Since this tidbit originated on Cult of Mac, and not Cult of Android, I’d hate to think someone is intentionally trying to cast Cook in a questionable light. I imagine you have thousands of photos that could go better with such a posting as this.

    Just one guy’s opinion.

  • br4978

    “Apple needs more unpredictability these days, not less.”

    Especially if you are a blogger looking for content. Other comments about the business necessity of secrecy are spot on. And as to Cook & Co.’s “bland, boilerplate comments”, well, that seems less mysterious than Steve Jobs, but no less informative than he was. I agree that actions will speak louder than words, but it seems a bit lame to ding Cook on style points. I’d rather read some inferential writing on what those developments might be and why.

  • br4978

    “Apple needs more unpredictability these days, not less.”

    Especially if you are a blogger looking for content. Other comments about the business necessity of secrecy are spot on. And as to Cook & Co.’s “bland, boilerplate comments”, well, that seems less mysterious than Steve Jobs, but no less informative than he was. I agree that actions will speak louder than words, but it seems a bit lame to ding Cook on style points. I’d rather read some inferential writing on what those developments might be and why.

About the author

Alex HeathAlex Heath has been a staff writer at Cult of Mac for three years. He is also a co-host of the CultCast. He has been quoted by the likes of the BBC, KRON 4 News, and books like "ICONIC: A Photographic Tribute to Apple Innovation." If you want to pitch a story, share a tip, or just get in touch, additional contact information is available on his personal site. Twitter always works too.

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