Kids Get In Trouble For Finding Teacher’s Erotic Pics On School iPad

Kids Get In Trouble For Finding Teacher’s Erotic Pics On School iPad

There are reasons why you should always understand how technology works before taking scandalous pictures of yourself and sending them to your lover. You don’t know where those pictures are going to end up. You might snap a naughty picture with your iPhone that then gets sent to your iCloud Photostream that is then synced with your school’s iPad. Then your students might be playing around on that school iPad, find the pic of you lookin’ saucy, and then all hell breaks loose.

That’s exactly what happened to one middle school teacher. The weird twist to the story is that the teacher didn’t get fired or suspended for having nearly pornographic photos of herself on a school device. The students that found it go suspended instead.

The teacher wasn’t fully topless in the photos, but police that investigated the incident said she was partially exposed from the neck down.The four seventh grade boys of Highland Middle School in Anderson, Indiana were suspended by school officials because even though the teacher gave them the iPad, they weren’t given permission to be using the iPhoto app.

Here’s how Anderson Community Schools spun the story in their official press release:

“A teacher gave certain students access to a school-owned iPad, which had been assigned to her, for a precise purpose of working within two different applications. The students explored the iPad and went to unauthorized applications, one of which was iPhotos. Unbeknownst to the teacher, a picture which was on the teacher’s personal cell phone had been stored in iCloud and therefore streamed to her school-owned iPad.”

It sounds like the four boys got the short end of things to us. What do you think? Should the teacher have received a punishment for her misuse of technology? Or are the boys really at fault? Tell us in the comments.

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  • John Rarick

    Heck no, teachers being punished for things like this is one of the real problems in America’s educational system. maybe being suspended is a bit much for the kids but the teacher did absolutely nothing wrong. She was using her own phone not the school’s iPad. It’s almost more Apple’s fault than hers. If ignorance was a crime we would all be in prison. Save the punishments for people who actually do terrible things to children. Also I find this article amusing because Anderson IN is only a 20 minute drive from me.

  • Jonathan Ober

    Well at least we know what the seventh grade boys will be thinking about when they are suspended :P

  • mr_bee

    The teacher did nothing malicious or intentionally wrong it was just a mistake on her part. They boys actively did something wrong, but it’s hardly a suspendible offence.

    Schools are completely f*cked up in general IMO so it’s hard to judge here in that almost everything about schools and school policies is wrong to begin with. Best advice is not to send your kids to school in the first place.

  • Michael Breed

    The boys were out of line. They had no business prying into that teacher’s personal information. Had they been sitting at the teacher’s desk to take a make-up quiz, is it okay to go through the desk’s drawers to see what they could find? Of course not. This is no different. They violated her personal privacy and deserve to be punished.

  • Ollie_McMillan

    Should’ve pressed share..

  • Shaun Green

    If the stupid teacher didn’t know how the technology works she shouldn’t have bought her own personal iPad into the classroom and let someone else use it. Kids will be kids. Of course they’re going to have a look at her photo’s. It’s just a mistake. Nobody should get fired or suspended over this. Live and learn.

  • Kevin Hancox

    This is precisely the reason why apple included certain software to stop people using apps they are NOT allowed to use… Goto Settings – General – Accessibility – Guided Access once switched on you open the app tap the home button 3 times and it locks into the app without the passcode you can’t use anything else… Maybe they should educate the teachers using the technology before implementing it to students who by there very nature are inquisitive and taught to be inquisitive…!

  • wdowell

    “iPhotos” ? Hmm sounds an interesting new app.. Must get that onto my iPad!

    The teacher is dumb. And big questions here: Why is a school iPad using the teacher’s personal iCloud account? And if that was so mandatory then why didn’t she have photo-streaming switched off?

    If a teacher had handed out a text book with adult pictures shoved in the back pages, would we have been cross with the students for flicking through the pages? I see no difference..

  • thegraphicmac

    Why in God’s name would she enter her own Apple ID into the school’s iPad, knowing that photos, etc. would be synced? To me, this is a situation where the teacher should be reprimanded for using taxpayer-funded hardware for personal use.

    Mark my words, the parents of those kids are going to threaten a lawsuit, and the school will not only let them back in, but they’ll have to suspend the teacher. She doesn’t deserve to get suspended, but they’ve effectively made that the default punishment when they suspended the kids.

  • FriarNurgle

    I’ll reserve judgement until all the facts come out. Regardless it is cool that the middle school has iPads. Wish my kids’ district switched to Apple.

  • Gavin Blur

    whatever – the kids got a glimpse into the future and the teacher major embarrassment… that should be it – great lesson for the day in class!

  • Andy Murdock

    I’m thinking that NO person should be punished. It sounds like a simple mistake and why not just learn a lesson and move on. But no, someone has to get punished so those in power can feel good about themselves.

  • Chilly8

    Since the applications were not locked down, and there was nothing, when attempting to access iPhotos, saying what they were doing is forbidden, they cannot be accused of doing anything without permission. It was not protected by any password or authentication system, that means they cannot be accused of doing something without permission.

  • shagans

    Come on, these 7th graders knew exactly what they were doing. Lets not pretend. … but good job guys :)

  • keir_john
    The boys were out of line. They had no business prying into that teacher’s personal information. Had they been sitting at the teacher’s desk to take a make-up quiz, is it okay to go through the desk’s drawers to see what they could find? Of course not. This is no different. They violated her personal privacy and deserve to be punished.

    They were on a SCHOOL ISSUED iPad, you clown. I work for a school district, and we issue these iPads to kids so that they WILL explore the devices. This idiot teacher had no business putting her personal iCloud account on a school issued iPad. There is absolutely no reason at all for anything personal to be on SCHOOL ISSUED PROPERTY, which is PAID FOR BY THE TAXPAYER FOR THE EXPRESS PURPOSE OF EDUCATING CHILDREN.

    Jesus.

  • keir_john

    Not only that, but this teacher and the district are quite possibly in violation of CIPA for allowing this to happen. That iPad should never have had personal account credentials on it. Period. That is a complete failure of technology policy on the part of the district.

  • Mr_Successbound

    The ipad was meant as a aid in teaching. The iPad triggers a child’s brain to explore and learn, and the teacher should be held responsible for her actions and publicly apologize for her actions. The kids should not have been suspended for something that wasn’t even their fault. The iPad has options where you can limit a child to a specific app, teachers should have proper training when it comes to today’s technology where everything is connected.

  • Scott Paciorek

    I live in Indiana where this happened. This lays at the teachers feet. The kids reported it when they found it. The iPad is school property she failed to follow policy and yet the kids get punished for doing the right thing. (By reporting it.)

  • nthnm

    Sucks. If only the kids could have emailed it to themselves and then forwarded that to the news. That would have been good – not so much for the teacher or the school district though.

  • wiredtothemaximum

    The iPads should fall under the schools “acceptable use policy”. For those that don’t think the teacher did anything wrong you obviously don’t have kids of your own. In my school if a teacher did this heads would roll…. no wait, this is EDU and normal corporate thinking doesn’t apply. I’m sure the administration at her school will use the classic CYA move, “this is a learning experience”. even though the teacher is an adult and should know better. All I can say is to the teacher is: “Dumb Ass” you deserve the embarrassment you brought on yourself.

  • nyc410

    even if the teacher did make the mistake of signing in with her own icloud account on a school ipad, in the iCloud settings, it gives you the option to turn photostream and other things off so they don’t sync with those specific devices. the teacher chose to sign in, and chose not to turn those options off (whether she was aware of them or not is her fault cause clearly she owns other iOS devices so she should know about that) so the teacher should be the one to get in trouble, not blame the students for being curious and exploring a device that wasnt locked under Guided Access.. what else do u expect from middle schoolers? when u give a student an ipad WITHOUT restricting things (or apps) you dont want them to have access to, you can’t hold them accountable for accessing those things (or apps). im sure we’ll hear more about this story once those parents present the school with a lawsuit…

  • RageAndSin

    Teacher is a cunt, fire her ass

  • technochick

    If the stupid teacher didn’t know how the technology works she shouldn’t have bought her own personal iPad into the classroom and let someone else use it.

    It wasn’t her personal iPad. It was school issued.

    Yes perhaps she was dumb for logging into iCloud on it, particularly with the same user account but from the sounds of it the photo didn’t actually show anything horrid. Despite the headline saying ‘erotic’ it sounds more like she was not exposed but perhaps in a bra or a teddy.

    And these kind ‘strict’ rules are what are needed if we are going to have kids using iPads etc in classes and enforce the not doing things like playing games, tweeting etc”

  • RJENK

    “The students that found it go suspended instead.”

    What kind of writing is this? When I was in high school in the 1980′s my teacher would have flagged me for that. I must assume that the writers here are nothing less than university graduates. And yet, you “educated writers” try to kick out stories so fast you couldn’t care less about proper use of our language. The story behind this article pales in comparison to that. You ought to write an article on yourselves. And while you’re at it, write on article on why your website is so dog slow to load (on my iPad, on my QuadCore iMac, unlike any other site I visit — it didn’t used to be that way).

  • originalp

    1. The teacher souldn’t have used her personal Apple ID on the school-issued iPad. 2. If she “had to” use her personal Apple ID then she could have not used iCloud sync. 3. If she “had to” use iCloud sync she could have at least not turned on Photo Stream. 4. There’s the Guided Access feature in the Settings which should be used properly by the school and the teacher to prevent miss-use of the iPad and things like this from happening.
    As I see it the teacher did about 4 things wrong here. The kids did one: Go into an app they weren’t supposed to. Kids are kids, and the school and the teacher need to learn how to use the technology they implement in the classroom before handing it out to kids.

  • Cgs101

    I’m glad the teacher isn’t to blame for once! The kids should be bitch slapped!

  • aepxc

    Wait, why the hell are the students getting suspended? Complaining about the use of a not-explicitly-authorised app on a school-issued iPad is like complaining about students paging beyond the explicitly-authorised pages of a school-issued book and finding a nudie picture of the teacher tucked inside.

    Now, the teacher did not really do anyone any harm with her ignorance/carelessness (though if the genders were reversed and it was a bunch of middle school girls who found their teacher’s Anthony Weiner, I suspect the reaction would be different), but the students are the entirely innocent party here.

  • wdowell
    This is precisely the reason why apple included certain software to stop people using apps they are NOT allowed to use… Goto Settings – General – Accessibility – Guided Access once switched on you open the app tap the home button 3 times and it locks into the app without the passcode you can’t use anything else… Maybe they should educate the teachers using the technology before implementing it to students who by there very nature are inquisitive and taught to be inquisitive…!

    Very good point about the settings being there to lock down devices.

    The problem is this teacher appears to have essentially commandeered the device for own personal use (with her iCloud account and dodgy photos and probably her personal email accounts too, i wouldn’t be surprised to learn ), so naturally she wasn’t going to start disabling things! If she didn’t know, which the district apparently claims, that her photos would be synced, I doubt she was the sort of person with a brain sufficiently attuned to using settings!

  • Michael Breed

    Irobut:

    First off, you’re the clown here. Probably more like an uprighteous moron, actually. I AM an educator running an iPad pilot project with an entire chemistry course. Read up on CIPA before you go throwing that acronym around. The biggest issue with the iPads is making sure the kids access only appropriate content and I do that extremely well. Front page story in the local newspaper and featured on television news. Ask yourself this, genius, why did the school issue an iPad that wasn’t locked down? Did they discuss proper use with the teacher? At my district, which is well known for being in the lead with technology, our students AND THEIR PARENTS sign an appropriate use contract… and those boys would have violated it. They should be punished.

    I’m not sure what Jesus had to do with this.

  • extra_medium

    I’m just wondering why the teacher was signed in with her personal credentials in order for icloud to be able to sync the photos. It sounds like she was probably using the iPad in unauthorized ways as well.

  • extra_medium

    the students are the entirely innocent party here.

    You obviously have never been a middle school aged boy, or its just been too long.
    Hot teacher gives the students an iPad to use two specific apps on. Students go poking around the iPhoto app to see what’s on hot teacher’s iPad. Entirely innocent, yes.

  • extra_medium

    the students are the entirely innocent party here.

    You obviously have never been a middle school aged boy, or its just been too long.
    Hot teacher gives the students an iPad to use two specific apps on. Students go poking around the iPhoto app to see what’s on hot teacher’s iPad. Entirely innocent, yes.

  • drew5617

    Here’s the thing, this teacher is not completely innocent in her ignorance on this. When you sign into iCloud, photo stream is one of the things that DOES NOT automatically turn itself on. So it’s not like she just didn’t know you can turn it off. She would have had to actually turn it on herself!! It’s ridiculous the kids are getting punished and the teacher is not.

  • aepxc

    At my district, which is well known for being in the lead with technology, our students AND THEIR PARENTS sign an appropriate use contract… and those boys would have violated it.

    Which part of a reasonable “appropriate use contract” could the boys possibly have violated? How can any software installed on a school-issued device – but neither disabled nor password protected – not be considered fair game for the student users of that device? In a desktop-oriented world, what the teacher did was equivalent to leaving behind nude JPGs of herself on the desktop of one of the machines in the computer lab. Or, back to your earlier example, the students were not simply asked to sit at the teacher’s desk – they were asked to go into some of the drawers (iPad < => desk; app < => drawer), though implicitly, perhaps not the one at the bottom with the whiskey and the dildo… which the teacher still never bothered to lock.

    Back to the use contract, if yours stipulates something such as “thou shalt not attempt to make any input unless and until explicitly instructed to do so by a member of the faculty” (which is the only rule I can see they boys violating), then I strongly suspect that the pilot will not go very far, despite its apparent press accolades. After all, the defining characteristic of general purpose computing is the freedom to do anything not expressly prohibited. Turning that around and proscribing all actions not expressly allowed turns a computing device into a glorified television.

  • Justin Alexander

    No way the students should be punished for the teacher’s mistake. And it is the teacher’s mistake. Did the school system give the iPad to the teacher and go use it like its personal but just bring it to work so the kids can use from time to time? For some reason I’m going to say that the school probably gave it to her as teaching tool not a device that she can sync to her account and add whatever she wanted to it. There are restrictions she could have turned on to stop her photos from syncing as well as password protecting the device and certain apps. But what it really amounts to is she should not have any private info on that device. What would have happened if the iPad stopped receiving a WiFi signal, would the IT department be suspended or fired for finding her photos? Would the kid’s have gotten in trouble for playing some of her music if it was something like “Where the Eagles Dare” by the Misfits or “Me So Horny” by 2 Live Crew? It sounds a little weird that the school system is saying she isn’t responsible for her own content on their device.

  • snarfblat

    What BS. Just because they were in an app they shouldn’t have been (which alone didn’t warrant suspension), the teacher had no business with those photos on there. Sure she may not have known about photostream or however they ended up, but she SHOULD have. And if it wasn’t “accidental” then the teacher should have been the one suspended.

  • Th3_1d

    “The students that found it go suspended instead.”

    What kind of writing is this? When I was in high school in the 1980′s my teacher would have flagged me for that. I must assume that the writers here are nothing less than university graduates. And yet, you “educated writers” try to kick out stories so fast you couldn’t care less about proper use of our language. The story behind this article pales in comparison to that. You ought to write an article on yourselves. And while you’re at it, write on article on why your website is so dog slow to load (on my iPad, on my QuadCore iMac, unlike any other site I visit — it didn’t used to be that way).

    Someones a little cranky, he forgot a t, settle down.

  • Nfamily

    Sounds like she made a mistake that I have heard hundreds of people make with iCloud.

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Buster HeinBuster Hein is Cult of Mac's Social Media Editor. Hailing from Roswell, New Mexico, but now spending his days in Phoenix, Arizona, he wastes most of his time eating burritos and reading Spanish romance novels. Twitter: @bst3r.

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