Sony Ericsson CEO: “We Should Have Taken the iPhone More Seriously”

Sony Ericsson CEO: “We Should Have Taken the iPhone More Seriously”

Sony Ericsson CEO Bert Nordberg recently sat down with the The Wall Street Journal to talk about the future of Sony Ericsson as a company and player in the smartphone market.

Nordberg was quoted as saying that the company “should have taken the iPhone more seriously when it arrived in 2007.”  You think, Nordberg?

TUAW notes that Norberg didn’t elaborate further on the comment in the interview, but it’s clear that he was referring to the fact that Sony Ericsson’s share of the mobile market has taken a sharp nosedive since the iPhone’s release.

The company took too long to transition from making “feature” phones running the Symbian OS to smartphones running Android. Sony Ericsson owned 4.3% of the global mobile phone market in Q3 of 2009, and the company reported a dismal 1.7% share in the second quarter of 2011. Apple grew to a 4.6% share of the global phone market in Q2 2011. Apple only sells the iPhone, while Sony Ericsson sells a vast lineup of feature phones and smartphones.

When asked about the company’s strategy on adopting new technologies, Nordberg said:

“We are quite careful throwing ourselves into new technology, simply because there is no guarantee that consumers will buy just because we develop it.”

Apple seems to have a slightly different approach.

Related
  • ctt1wbw

    Nothing wrong with S/E phones.  The BEST phone I ever had before the iPhone was the S/E s710a.  I LOVED that phone.  But as I’ve said time and time again, it’s all about the apps.  The quality of apps on the iOS platform is far superior to that of other smart phone app stores.

  • shenando

    my previous phones before i started using iPhones, were all from SE… Some of the best. but without an app market like the App store, it just wasn’t good enough. Apps customize one’s phone more than what themes/wallpapers can…

  • railstop13

    Ahhh, hindsight. 

  • baby_Twitty

    “We are quite careful throwing ourselves into new technology, simply because there is no guarantee that consumers will buy just because we develop it.” 

    Really? Mr Nordberg has certainly never heard of the phrase, “If you build it, they will come.”

  • Tessier Stirlo Ashpool

    they’ve only had like 48 months to respond too..  poor poor SE

  • Ture

    No one blames you. Initially the iphone could not send mms, copy/paste etc. 

  • Nitin Gk

    Not so true miss.. can’t build something truly innovative, but utterly useless because of the existing support structures within other related industries.. Like I could build apps for smart phones in 2000 but no one would buy it.. :P There weren’t enough smartphone users!

  • gareth edwards

    Looking back SE should have done a few things differently. One, which was even obvious before Apple turned up on the scene was reducing their market offering. They, as Nokia did, offered waaaay too many phone designs and skews. As for not taking Apple seriously, this isn’t as damning and not forseeing the future of the phone market as a smart phone market in general. Sony were in a great position to lead the pack if they had made some solid relationships with people like MS and concentrated on the consumer experience. As it was (and is to a certain extent) a lot of companies even now are still getting the basics wrong – just look at all the woes in the Tablet market.

  • Matthias Wolf

    SE (and Nokia) locked themselves in a innovation unfriendly state, years before the iPhone appeared. They had way to many phones. Many very similar and competing with each other. And then they sold their phones to carriers, not consumers, often with varying model numbers, further confusing the customer. The carriers wouldn’t buy/offer radically new ideas. Therefore locking SE in an infinite loop of more and more identical phones.

  • Figurative

    Heh Heh.  I guess the conjoined RIM CEOs are saying the same thing.

  • minimalist1969

    “We are quite careful throwing ourselves into new
    technology, simply because there is no guarantee that consumers will buy just
    because we develop it.”

     

    Wow, that statement pretty much sums up
    everything that is wrong with Sony today. 
    The Walkman and the Trinitron would have never been created if the Sony
    of the late 70’s and early 80’s had acted like that.  So sad to see a company that once embodied innovation
    and top notch quality sink to this level.

About the author

Alex HeathAlex Heath has been a staff writer at Cult of Mac for over two years. He is also a co-host of the CultCast. He has been quoted by places like the BBC, KRON 4 News, and books like "ICONIC: A Photographic Tribute to Apple Innovation." If you want to get in touch, additional contact information is available on his personal site. Twitter always works too.

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