Amazon Laughs in Apple’s Face With Web-Based Kindle Reader for iPad

Amazon Laughs in Apple’s Face With Web-Based Kindle Reader for iPad

Amazon’s Kindle application was recently at risk of being removed from the App Store because it contained a link to purchase content outside of Apple’s ecosystem — something Apple no longer allows developers to do under its latest App Store terms. In order to secure its place in the App Store, Amazon issued a last-minute update to its app to remove the link, but in a move that subtly tells Apple where to stick its new rules, Amazon has launched a web-based Kindle reader with support for the iPad. And it’s awesome!

The new app, called Kindle Cloud Reader, works with Chrome and Safari web browsers — including mobile Safari on the iPad — to give Kindle users access to their eBooks without the need for a native application. But why would you want to use a web app over Amazon’s native application? Well, for one, it boasts a Kindle store.

Unlike the native iOS app, which no longer offers any method of purchasing new eBooks from Amazon’s Kindle Store, the web app boasts an “integrated Kindle Store for tablets,” with access to Amazon’s complete collection of titles.

The web app also supports local storage and allows you to store content for reading offline — what more could you ask for?

You can access the web app now by visiting read.amazon.com in a supported browser.

Have you tried the Kindle Cloud Reader yet, and will you be dropping the native Kindle app in favor of Amazon’s new web app?

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  • Fryguy

    Doesn’t appear to want to launch, or even open if already launched, if my WiFi only iPad is not online.

  • Samuel Ford

    Yeah, I used that when it was called O’Reilly Safari Books Online. It sucked then, too. The ultimate insult was the amazing craptacular iPad app they released written with PhoneGap (also a webkit-based cross platform UI). It sucked so hard it finally motivated me to cancel my subscription.

    Tried out the Kindle web reader on my Mac & iPad. It’s passable on a Mac, not so much on an iPad. Cuts off the bottom of the page, doesn’t respond to page turn touches consistently, and is just generally fidgetty.

    Maybe this makes somebody at Amazon feel good; sort of a cathartic FU. However, it doesn’t seem like Apple would be against this move at all. After all, most of the features it uses were *pioneered* by Apple and work best on Apple devices & software (or those derived from it, like Chrome). 

  • shucai45
  • shucai45
  • Jim Gatos

    Where does it store the downloaded books? In case I want to uninstall the folder?

  • FloydRichards

    I just paid $ 23.86 for an iPhone and my girlfriend loves her Dell laptop that we got for $ 38.76 there arriving tomorrow by UPS I will never pay such expensive retail prices in stores again. Especially when I also sold a 42 inch LED TV to my boss for $ 665 which only cost me $ 62,81 to buy. Here is the website we use to get it all from, GrabPenny.com

  • Karras

    Meh. I’ll stick with the regular app thanks.

    Tell me, justified ranting about Apple being overly restrictive at times aside. is the removal of a link to their store really a deal breaker for anyone?

  • shucai45
  • Felichiomo

    but its in in a web browser so how can it store files more importantly how can you can access them offline as they’re in a web browser

  • Michael

    Just because there’s no Store button in the Kindle app anymore doesn’t mean you can’t download books to the app. Just go to the Kindle Store in Mobile Safari and download a book like you normally would.

  • Un_FollowMe

    hahahahahhahahh I love this. I can’t stop laughing bwahahahahahaha it was bound to happen sooner than later, APPLE is becoming overbearing. 

  • hausoftrinity

    You should see the reviews for the Kindle app in the App Store. Half of them are complaining about the link removal. I just bookmarked the site in mobile safari. 

  • Karras

    Well to each their own but I for one consider it to be pretty petty. I bookmarked the site as well but I am not so sure I shall be using it much.

  • vipshopper67
  • Guest
  • Karras

    Exactly! How is that so hard?

    I do not understand the rationale behind forsaking the app store app anyway. It is free people! Do you think by not downloading it you are harming Apple? Doing Amazon any favours? Apple have nothing to make or lose on it and the development costs Amazon have sunk into it start to go to waste as less people use it. If anything, it is probably sticking it to Apple more if you do download it as you are using the app store to help support the activities of a competing book store, without paying Apple a cent for their part in it.

  • Mike Rathjen

    Probably Safari cached files, just like any other web content. So it will be cleaned up as needed, and there is a strong possibility you won’t be able to access it offline.

  • Mike Rathjen

    Doesn’t sound like it would work offline, so I’d still rather download books to the app.

  • John Ramirez

    hahaha, I love how Amazon has circumvented this, dont get me wrong, I love apple, but dont care to much for all the restrictions they place.

  • Steve Payonzeck

    Um, didn’t Apple introduce the notion of third party apps on the iPhone by telling developers that the “sweet solution” for apps was via HTML 5/web apps? It was developers that demanded that Apple allow them to create native apps. Which Apple then allowed them to do with the SDK. So developers creating web apps are doing what Apple initially encouraged them to do.

    In fact, Apple has maintained a web page listing available web apps since Jobs first noted the “sweet solution”.

    http://www.apple.com/webapps/

  • Anony Mous

    I simply didn’t download the update. Said right there in the update page “we’ve removed the kindle store link” or something similarly clear; so I didn’t download it, nor do I plan to download it. I’m not connected all the time, so the app is a much better solution for me. Job’s idea of HTML5 apps being the “sweet solution” is a myopic view generated by someone who lives where connectivity is the norm — but that’s not true in a great deal of the USA. Additionally, even where it *is* true, it’s an extra cost option through 3G; wifi is on-again/off-again as you move from one hotspot to the next. The whole point of the kindle reader is it is portable — not that you can only read when you’re online. In any case, this idea (webapp) is a non-starter for me.

About the author

Killian BellKillian Bell is a staff writer based in the U.K. He has an interest in all things tech and also covers Android over at CultofAndroid.com. You can follow him on Twitter via @killianbell.

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