These Are The Top 10 Most Common iPhone Passcodes, Is Yours On The List?

These Are The Top 10 Most Common iPhone Passcodes, Is Yours On The List?

15% of all iPhone owners use one of just ten passwords on their lock screen, making it trivial for thieves with physical access to hack into their device with just some remedial trial-and-error. Is your passcode on the list?

Here are the ten most commonly used passcodes according to the developer of the Big Brother Camera Security app, who fitted some anonymous tracking code into his app to figure out which passcodes people were using most often on Big Brother Camera Security, which should also translate to the iOS’s proper lock screen.

The most common passcodes, in descending order:

• 1234
• 0000
• 2580
• 1111
• 5555
• 5683
• 0852
• 2222
• 1212
• 1998

1998’s addition at the bottom of the list is interesting, as it’s the only one that doesn’t follow a pattern. However, after 1998, most of the popular passcodes were years, with the 1990s being the most likely decade to be a workable passcode. That’s likely because people are mostly picking passcodes that correspond to their birth or graduation year.

The lesson? You shouldn’t be using non-random passcodes if you’re serious about your iPhone’s security, and set your iPhone to data wipe automatically after ten failed entries.

Tell us true: did you see your passcode on this list? If so, will you change your passcode now, or are you less worried about your data’s security than your handset’s physical security? Let us know!

Related
  • Doug Bursnall

    5683 – what gives with that one?

  • Jhgkjhgkj

    2580 for me

  • Dreamgrifter Films

    That’s the passcode to my luggage!

  • Chris Malone

    “Tell us true” Fail. XD

  • Roybland

    A week ago I was shut out of my IPad although I was entering the correct passcode – and had to restore to unlock. It happened after I had attempted to enter the code but the keys did not respond and I had to hit them two or three times before anything appeared in the passcode cells. Then I was locked out despite the correct passcode. Why?

  • FultonKBD

    Mine isn’t on the list. But if you type your iPhone code here and click “post” it automatically converts it to bullets. For example mine is ••••   :)

  • Chris

    not on the list ;)

  • virjog

    interesting…possibly because first 2 digits and last 2 digits add up to 11

  • Robby Wilkinson

    Love.

  • sjrollings

    l o v e ;)

  • Robby Wilkinson

    It’s love. Every teenage girl will use that.

  • virjog

    oh yea i guess that makes sense lol

  • c.t

    Mine is not 5683

    iDont even have a iDevice

  • Doug Bursnall

    Cheers, I didn’t have letters on phones growing up, and skipped texting.

  • Jimjoebobcarter

    How is 5683  a pattern? am i missing something?

  • Gordon_Keenan

    Phew! At least my 4321 is safe! Argh! DOH!

  • ZappCatt

    yep it was there…so cool

  • Meletis

    mine is there… o.O

  • aga

    The scary part is the app has pass code tracking built into it. In other words, it is monitoring YOUR pass code and sending that data back to the app developer!

    Why has Apple allowed that through? I just downloaded and installed it. There is no warning that the app will monitor password activity.

    App on iPhone to test if there was a warning, app OFF iPhone before finishing this post. Stuff that!

  • Alex

    You must have grown up before the ITU E.161 / ISO 9995-8. standards came into effect.

  • Tallest_Skil

    Know what I’d love? I’d love to have the secondary keyboard inputs available for the long password.

    You can have a long password, but only in the primary language running on the system.

    I’d love to have a password NO ONE could guess, and I could have that simply by being able to switch to Hiragana and write out my password.

  • diesel-benz

    The scary thing isn’t the list of passwords, its that nobody cares an app is recording and reporting user’s passwords to a third party without permission!

  • Eric_S_Romero

    Nope, not on the list. I do have an iPhone password, but I change it at least every week for security purposes, and I also have the data wipe feature if I put in the password wrong ten times. I’ve had an iPod Touch stolen that didn’t have a password on it, and deeply regretted it that I didn’t have on there. Now I know, and knowing is the half the battle.

  • Jarret Pesola

    Yes, my passcode is on the list.
    No, I don’t plan on changing it.
    And yes, I am less worried about my data security than the physical condition of the phone.
    Plus, I usually always have it on me and know when I don’t.

  • prof_peabody

    Yeah, I think this developer either got himself a short trip *out* of the app store, or the app store isn’t as trustworthy as you’d think it was.  

    This is way underhanded behaviour and kind of illegal in some countries.  

  • Brett Mirly

    it spells love… it is on practically every iDevice owned by a girl under 20

  • prof_peabody

    Why don’t people use longer, non-numerical passwords instead?  Numbers can always be guessed by a computer in a matter of a minute or less.  

  • Didnt Work

    It spells “LOVE” on a touch-tone phone

  • Tom Losh

    Nothing even remotely similar to my phone PIN is on the list…

    None of them start with the same number, one of the other numbers I use isn’t even in that list, and there is no symmetry or pattern to the numbers I use. I feel like mine is reasonable. :)

  • Ronald Stepp

    Probably because numbers is all it lets you enter… oh wait, I hope this was a sarcastic post by you.  8 )

  • Ronald Stepp

    Heh heh, it doesn’t matter if you change it every week, the guy who steals it isn’t going to be stopped by that practice, thinking “Oh damn I don’t know what this guys code was last week so I guess I can’t check the same 9,999 possibilities I was going to try anyway.”

    No matter what you pick, it’s STILL JUST 4 DIGITS!  heh..

  • Ronald Stepp

    Whatever the problem was, that’s one hell of a security system you have there.  LOL.  Think if you could write an app that let you set a behavior for your ipad password.  Set it to do exactly what it was doing to you, as long as you don’t do the 2, 3, or more actions that you program as your “safe action sequence” to unlock the device.

  • Ronald Stepp

    Whatever the problem was, that’s one hell of a security system you have there.  LOL.  Think if you could write an app that let you set a behavior for your ipad password.  Set it to do exactly what it was doing to you, as long as you don’t do the 2, 3, or more actions that you program as your “safe action sequence” to unlock the device.

  • Jonas Mejdal Bøgild

    Nope. Mine’s not on the list.

  • H3R1CAN3

    I hope YOUR post was sarcastic.

  • Wirehedd

    I guess I was smart enough to use one of the other 9990 codes available.

  • AgirlyGirl

    This is mine for anyone interested: 1432. Which means “i love you too”. 

  • Reivax

    I use a mix of upper- and lowercase numerals… just to be extra safe.

  • Ronald Stepp

    Absolutely!

  • Robert X

    Wasn’t there…

  • Anthony

    Well at least it’s just the app’s password rather than the password for your iDevice. 

  • Ahsan Akram

    Mine’s ••••

  • SSD

    There are only what, 10,000 possible passcodes for 4 digits?  Switch “Simple Passcode” OFF, and use a mix of letters and numbers.  Even if you only use 4 alpha-numeric characters, that’s 14 million possible combinations (not including punctuation marks).  Even if you don’t set “wipe after 10 tries,” it will still take them a REALLY long time to get in.

  • nthnm

    LOL! Well somebody hasn’t looked at the security settings available.

  • poo

    Mine’s 1504

  • Robert Eschbacher

    3825

  • Barelyabsolut

    ···· Totally true!!!! OMG ···· 

    ···· Hahaha. 

  • CharliK

    That’s what I did. 

  • CharliK

    The really cool teenage girls use 5338.

  • Takeo

    Mine is: Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious – in numeric – gotta admit it helps to write the number-order down.

    Jailbreak rocks – so you can have long passwords like that! *thumbs up*

  • Ronald Stepp

    Arg!  Well judging by the fact that all the passcodes shown are 4-digit numbers, neither have any of them!  Heh, thanks for the tip though, it doesn’t help that Apple makes the DEFAULT simple turned on.  Thx again.

  • Guest

    Another simple one is 9731, 0321

  • Roland

    Same here…its straight down and easy on the pad.

  • Fizz

    Instead of 5683, mine’s 5386.

  • qoqo

    Surprised l337 wasn’t listed. No, wait, that’d be the Android crowd.

  • AbdulkarimSalahuddin

    Mine is 2748……….I don’t think it matches to anyone’s. 

  • Arunghimawan

    interesting  enough my passcode is weak, LOL , but seriously my passcode is 5555

  • Jason Burns

    2012?

  • poppa1138

    1138 same as George Lucas

  • 0000

    BINGO!

  • poppa1138
  • NoobianGod

    Mine is safe.

  • MattSTKC

    yes, let’s all submit our iphone passcodes as comments on this story. Genius people. Pure genius.

  • Iame

    GI JOE!

  • djrobsd

    A pass code is just an illusion of security.  I’m sure the hackers have figured out a way to get around it anyway… But at least a little common sense goes a long way, try using the street number of a house you grew up in or something that most people who know you wouldn’t even know.

  • erickfitzroman

    I turned off the simple passcode ASAP…..my advice, go to the dictionary and find the biggest darn word you can find and use some numbers that mean nothing to you.

  • Mac Nz

    I win – I don’t have a password (LOL)

  • stokessd

    Damn, where are the geeks?  I thought for sure that Pi or e would be on the list.  3142 is where it’s at people… apple pi for crissakes. 

    Sheldon

  • Buzz IT

    Apple removes the app real fast
    http://buzzintechnology.com/20

  • Mdsault

    my iphone code is 4925

  • James_Smith

    Better yet, get a life, not an iPhone.

  • Ssffww

    I have a life and an iPhone thank you. 

  • James_Smith

    But your “life” probably revolves around your phone.  How sad.

About the author

John BrownleeJohn Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his girlfriend and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

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